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Current Issue
June, 2018
Volume 44, Number 2
  
19 February 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Pope Benedict XVI greets Rabbi Elio Toaff, the former chief rabbi of Rome, during a visit to the main synagogue in Rome in this 2010 file photo. (photo: CNS/L’Osservatore Romano via Reuters)

Netanyahu thanks pope for deepening Christian-Jewish ties (Reuters) Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu thanked outgoing Pope Benedict XVI on Monday for his efforts to shore up often troubled relations between the Roman Catholic Church and Jews, including with his 2009 visit to the Holy Land. That trip, in which the German-born Benedict paid respects at Israel’s main Holocaust memorial, was seen by many Jews as atoning for his lifting of the excommunication of a bishop who questioned the scale of the Nazi genocide. On other occasions he visited the Auschwitz death camp and the Cologne synagogue. The pontiff, who will abdicate on February 28, also changed a Latin prayer for Good Friday services by traditionalist Catholics in 2008, deleting a reference to Jews and their “blindness” but still calling for them to accept Jesus. “I thank you also for bravely defending the values of Judaism and Christianity during your papal term,” Netanyahu said…

Egyptian Christians institute national ecumenical council (Fides) In Egypt, representatives of several different Christian denominations met in St. Mark’s Coptic Orthodox Cathedral, in the capital’s al Abbasiy district, to sign the statutes of the country’s first National Council of Christian Churches. Leading members of five churches — Coptic Orthodox, Coptic Catholic, Greek Orthodox, Anglican and evangelical Protestant — attended the founding meeting, each heading a delegation of five representatives. Those present included Coptic Orthodox Patriarch Tawadros II, Coptic Catholic Patriarch Ibrahim Isaac Sidrak and Greek Orthodox Patriarch Theodoros II of Alexandria. “The new body,” said Coptic Catholic Bishop Kyrillos William of Assiut, “will help us proceed together along the path of ecumenism, and reveal our shared position regarding dialogue and peaceful cohabitation with non-Christians. It will also certainly provide opportunities for shared social and cultural initiatives.” Bishop Kyrillos underlined that the new Council “will have no strictly political profile and certainly no ability to exercise binding authority over the activity of the individual Churches.” However, its foundation is billed as critical to the future of Christian communities in Egypt, and confirms the ecumenical awareness of the new Coptic Orthodox patriarch, installed November last year…

U.N.: Both sides committing war crimes in Syria (Al Jazeera) Both government forces and armed rebels are committing war crimes, including killings and torture, spreading terror among civilians in a nearly two-year-old conflict, a United Nations panel said on Monday. The investigators’ latest report, covering the six months to mid-January, was based on 445 interviews conducted abroad with victims and witnesses, as they have not been allowed into Syria. The independent team, led by Brazilian Paulo Pinheiro, called on the U.N. Security Council to “act urgently to ensure accountability” for grave violations, possibly by referring the violators to the International Criminal Court for prosecution…

Coptic church attacked in Egypt (Vatican Radio) More than one year after the Arab Awakening, Christians in Egypt continue to suffer persecution. The latest attack happened Friday, when a mob of a few hundred people threw stones and set fire to St. Georgas Coptic Church in Sarsena. The village is located about 60 miles southwest of Cairo. A few parishioners and the pastor were slightly injured before a local Muslim family helped them to escape the scene. The attack was led by a local Muslim fringe group. The Salafist group claimed that the church was illegal and wanted it demolished because of its close location to a largely Muslim neighborhood. Embedded below is an audio file of the radio report…

Jesuit expert calls Pope Benedict XVI a ‘great reformer’ on sex abuse (National Catholic Reporter) Jesuit Father Hans Zollner, the academic vice-rector of the Jesuit-run Gregorian University in Rome and head of its Institute of Psychology, has studied the church’s rocky history on the issue of sex abuse at length, publishing the 2010 book Chiesa e pedofilia – Una ferita aperta: Un approccio psicologico-pastorale (“The Church and Pedophilia – An Open Wound: A Psychological and Pastoral Approach”), along with fellow Jesuit Father Giovanni Cucci. “Based on what I know personally, at the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith he was the first person, and the most determined person, to take on what he called the ‘open wound’ in the body of the church, meaning the sexual abuse of minors by clergy. He came to know about a number of cases, and the intensity of the wounds inflicted on victims. He became aware of what priests had done to minors, and to vulnerable adults. As a result, he became more and more convinced that it has to be tackled, and at various levels he started to deal with it — the canonical level, the ecclesial, and the personal”…

Church and civic leaders attend ecumenical Divine Liturgy in Beirut (Naharnet) Greek Orthodox Patriarch Youhanna X of Antioch and All the East celebrated the Divine Liturgy at the St. Nicolas Cathedral in Beirut’s Ashrafiyeh district on Sunday in the presence of the country’s top political and spiritual leaders. President Michel Suleiman, Prime Minister Najib Miqati, Phalange leader Amin Gemayel and Maronite Patriarch Bechara Peter were among those present. Diplomats, including Syrian and Russian ambassadors, also attended. The Divine Liturgy was held on the occasion of Patriarch Youhanna’s visit to Beirut. In his sermon, the Greek Orthodox leader stressed that Muslims are partners in the nation. “Our ties with them extend beyond coexistence. We share with them building the future,” he said…



Tags: Egypt Syrian Civil War Unity Ecumenism Christian-Muslim relations