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Volume 43, Number 4
  
13 June 2012
Erin Edwards




Novices pose for a portrait at the mother house of the Daughters of Mary in India.
(photo: John E. Kozar)


When you give to CNEWA this month, your gift will be doubled to support sisters in the regions we serve. Your generosity not only provides support to the sisters working in the field, but it supports the formation of these women. While in India earlier this year, CNEWA President Msgr. John Kozar had an opportunity to meet with novices at the mother house of the Daughters of Mary:

After a plentiful breakfast and more wonderful conversation with the major archbishop and his chancery officials, we headed out to the mother house of the Daughters of Mary, one of the larger congregations of women religious in the Trivandrum Syro-Malankara Catholic Church.

Waiting at the doorway was our host, Mother Roselin, D.M., the superior of the community. After a coffee with Mother and other council members, she proceeded to give us a mini tour of the facility and to introduce us to a lovely, smiling group of novices, postulants and aspirants — about 50 in total. The joy and happiness of these young girls and sisters was infectious. They greeted us with songs and kind expressions of welcome. And I was invited to share with them about my own life and the work of CNEWA.

Visit our website to learn how you can double your gift to sisters.



Tags: India Sisters Syro-Malabar Catholic Church Vocations (religious)

6 June 2012
Erin Edwards




Workers at a spice factory in Cochin clean cloves before processing. Cochin is the hub of Kerala's spice trade. (photo: Peter Lemieux)

In the current edition of ONE, photojournalist Peter Lemieux reported on Kerala’s spice trade. Peter spoke with us about his experience reporting and photographing for the story. Watch the interview below:

To read Peter’s article Kerala’s Spice Coast, visit ONE’s online May edition.



Tags: India Kerala Thomas Christians Employment Tourism

31 May 2012
Greg Kandra




Workers at Orient Spice Company clean raw turmeric before processing. (photo: Peter Lemieux)

Trading in spices helped bring Christianity to India nearly two millennia ago, and the country continues to depend on spices for much of its livelihood. Many of the workers in processing plants are women, such as those shown above, who do the hard work of cleaning raw turmeric. Photojournalist Peter Lemieux looks at the spice trade in the May issue of ONE:

Since the 14th century, Cochin has served as the hub of the coast’s spice trade.

At first glance, the city’s spice industry today resembles that of a bygone era. A large safe harbor dominates the cityscape. A dense concentration of processing and warehousing facilities crowds the waterfront. Countless traders and middlemen walk the streets, going about their day-to-day business.

A timeworn port city, Cochin also represents Kerala’s melting pot, with its diverse religious communities, global marketplace and world-class tourist attractions. As always, its spices reach markets all over the world. In the past 20 years, exports to the United States in particular have doubled and now constitute the largest share leaving Cochin’s port.

But on closer look, it becomes clear how much the business has adapted to the modern world. Traders now sit in offices glued to their computer screens, monitoring up-to-the-second fluctuations in global prices. The ticker list of spices is lengthy and includes many new hybrid varieties, each offering something special — brighter color, greater flavor, a longer shelf life. Advanced technologies in processing, packaging and shipping have also transformed the business.

“Fifteen years ago, there were no quality standards in India for spice export. Any low quality item could be shipped,” explains Bobby Jacob Markose, owner of Orient Spice Company, over the hum of his spice grinders pulverizing raw turmeric. “But that phase is out. Technology is here now. ’Food Safe’ is the motto. Cleaning, grinding and steam sterilization are the facilities that can be sustained now.”

You can read more in the article Kerala’s Spice Coast.



Tags: India Kerala Indian Christians Thomas Christians

23 May 2012
Erin Edwards




In this undated photo from our archive, a group of children play in India.
(photo: Sister Christian Molidor, R.S.M.)


Through the local churches, CNEWA has played a major role in serving the needy in India for many years. To learn about the people and places we serve there, check out Msgr. Kozar’s blog series from his pastoral visit to India earlier this year. It made a powerful impression him.

As Msgr. Kozar put it:

We are privileged and have the honor of reaching out to the needs of so many in India. As much as we might do in helping them, we receive infinitely more as we experience their courage, their kindness, their patience, and especially their FAITH. Yes, above all they are filled with faith. Their trust in God watching over them, with a little help from our CNEWA family, is the great equalizer. It not only keeps them going, but it also brings joy and happiness to their lives…

… I would like to acknowledge our regional director, M.L. Thomas, for his exceptional work in coordinating all our CNEWA efforts in India. He, along with his very devoted staff, serves as the conduit for our charity. It is a huge operation: 349 institutions helped, 22,000 children under sponsorship, thousands of seminarians as adopted spiritual sons, 700 women novices being sponsored and countless projects and programs.

To learn how you can help support the work of CNEWA in India, visit our website.



Tags: India Children

2 May 2012
Erin Edwards




Residents of St. Joseph’s Orphanage take a break from classes.
(photo: Cody Christopulos)


In the September 2005 issue of ONE, Paul Wachter reported on the lasting impact of St. Joseph’s Orphanage on its residents in Kerala:

“Nearly all the girls are scared when they first get here, which is only natural,” said Sister Flower Mary. “But they soon make friends. We try to make this transition period as easy as possible for them by making sure the new girls are well-attended to.

“In many cases, the friends they make here will be with them for the rest of their lives,” Sister Flower Mary continued. “And they will always be a part of my life. Just because they move away and get a job or get married doesn’t mean I don’t stay in touch with them. We are all one big family.”

For more, read St. Joseph’s ‘Orphans’.



Tags: India Kerala Orphans/Orphanages

1 May 2012
Erin Edwards




In this photo taken in 2008, people attending a retreat in Purakkad, Kerala, pray at a shrine
devoted to Mary. (photo: Peter Lemieux)


May is the month Catholics devote to honoring the Virgin Mary. In the regions CNEWA serves, icons of Mary are not only found in churches but are common household items as well.

Above, we see one example from Kerala in India. For more, read Purakkad’s Natural Harmony. And, be sure to check out the accompanying slideshow featuring more of Peter Lemieux’s photos documenting life in the village.



Tags: India Kerala Icons

25 April 2012
Erin Edwards




In this photo taken in 2009, an Elephant is adorned and presented during a temple festival in Irinjalakuda, Kerala. (photo: Cody Christopulos)

The Asian Elephant is a major part of Kerala’s culture. Elephants often appear in folk songs, folklore and place names. Today, they are used in Hindu temple festivals and as a tourist attraction.

To read more about Kerala and India, check out Msgr. John Kozar’s blog posts ”In the Footsteps of St. Thomas.”



Tags: India Cultural Identity Kerala

19 April 2012
Erin Edwards




A mother and child visit the site where their new home will be built in the village of Podiyattuvila, Kerala. (photo: John E. Kozar)

Last month, CNEWA president Msgr. John Kozar visited with some of the people and projects that CNEWA supports in India. Among those he met were the people of the village of Podiyattuvila, who were on the path to home ownership for the first time. Msgr. Kozar writes about his experience in the most recent issue of ONE:

It is with a sense of gratitude that she invited me to see what was, block by block and bucket by bucket of cement, becoming her home. She, her husband and neighboring helpers and parishioners are the contractors and builders. A humble gift of $1,800 made all this possible. CNEWA is assisting in building five such houses.

Your charity as a donor allows CNEWA to bring such dignity to countless suffering poor in India and many other countries. And perhaps the greatest expression of gratitude from the poor, besides the smiles and the obvious quiet pride, is the promise of prayers.

Read more about Msgr. Kozar’s experiences in India in the magazine and on the blog.



Tags: India CNEWA Kerala Homes/housing

12 April 2012
Erin Edwards




Residents of Palai Girls’ Town in Kerala perform onstage. (photo: John E. Kozar)

During his trip to India last month, CNEWA president Msgr. John Kozar had the opportunity to visit CNEWA-supported institutions and projects, like Palai Girls’ Town in Kerala. Here’s what Msgr. Kozar experienced upon visiting the girls home:

Guess what kind of welcoming reception greeted us as we entered the rather large compound: A large, beautifully bedecked marching band made up of about 35 girls who live at this orphanage. They led us into a large and immaculately clean auditorium where we were given the ceremonial bouquet of flowers. A special treat of this visit was to meet the founder of the congregation, Father Abraham, and the sisters’ superior general, Mother Virmala. Father Abraham is 98 years old and is still sharp in mind, albeit limited in mobility. What an honor to be in his presence!

The girls also presented some absolutely professional-grade dancing entertainment. They were dressed in classical Indian garb, displaying intricate moves, and were well disciplined in their every move. The superior told me they have won a number of competitions. There are about 175 girls at this institution and CNEWA has been a major donor in support of the wonderful programs offered to the girls. In many of these “orphanages,” the girls are not necessarily orphans in the traditional sense, but are nonetheless in need of some type of support. Some have lost a parent; others have parents who cannot care for them. Some have been abandoned; others have parents too involved with caring for the ills of another family member.

For more of Msgr. Kozar’s impressions from his visit to India, check out all of his blog posts from his India visit.



Tags: India CNEWA Kerala Msgr. John E. Kozar

27 March 2012
Erin Edwards




Nirmala Dasi sisters walk with young patients on the grounds of Grace Home in Trichur, India. (photo: John E. Kozar)

We’ve profiled the amazing work of the Nirmala Dasi Sisters in ONE magazine numerous times over the years. Earlier this month, CNEWA President, Msgr. John Kozar, had the opportunity to meet with some of these women and see first-hand the “thankless” work they do on behalf of society’s destitute and unwanted, including single mothers, persons with Hansen’s disease and the mentally ill in Kerala. In the November 2010 issue of ONE, Peter Lemieux reported on the great work of these sisters on behalf of children and adults with H.I.V/AIDS at the Grace Home in Trichur, India:

With the school-age children gone, a quiet falls upon the grounds of Grace Home — that is until a 2-year-old boy noisily pushes his pintsize tricycle across the facility’s marble floor. The tricycle plays an electronic version of “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.” Energetic and healthy — in fact, rather pudgy — the boy first came to Grace Home in 2009 covered in scabies and looking lean, says Sister Lisi, who calls him simply Chakara, or “sweetie” in the local Malayalam language.

“He would cry all day and all night,” she says. “Maybe he was thinking about his mother — she lost her mind and lived with Chakara in the Kuttippuram Railway Station, taking him here and there. Or maybe he feared he was going to be given away.

“He’s in good condition right now,” boasts Sister Lisi, adding that Chakara’s CD4 count is high, at more than 800. “He doesn’t need ARTs.”

Chakara’s attachment to Sister Lisi is unmistakable. He clutches her habit at the knees. She picks him up and puts him back down. He pushes the tricycle around some more and then into her feet. Sister Lisi ignores him. Chakara gets fussy and she picks him up again.

“At his age, he needs a mother’s concern and love,” says Sister Lisi. “I feel like I’ve been appointed his mother. Now he’s getting so much love. I don’t know how much love I have to give, but whatever I have I give.”

Sister Lisi’s love and devotion are characteristic of the Nirmala Dasi Sisters. All 300 of its members, including 50 devoted to persons living with H.I.V./AIDS, “care for those who nobody else will care for,” says Msgr. Vilangadan.

The Nirmala Dasi Sisters care for society’s destitute and unwanted, including single mothers, persons with Hansen’s disease and the mentally ill in Kerala, Mumbai and as far away as Kenya. But no matter where they serve, says Msgr. Vilangadan, “they must be witnessing. We must show how Christ lived and show the kind of person he was — humble, poor, hardworking, striving to save the souls of the poor and sick. Our life must be an extension of Christ’s life.”

To learn how you can help CNEWA continue to support courageous sisters like the Nirmala Dasi Sisters, visit our “Celebrating Women” campaign on Causes. There is still time to give to our March matching challenge in honor of these women and others like them in the countries CNEWA serves.



Tags: India Sisters Kerala HIV/AIDS





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