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September, 2017
Volume 43, Number 3
  
30 December 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Metropolitan Pavel, recently elected to serve as head of the Belarusian Orthodox Church, has previously led his church in the United States and Canada, as well as Vienna and Budapest. (photo: Belarusian Orthodox Church)

Belarusian Orthodox Church elects new leader (BelTA) Metropolitan Pavel of Ryazan and Mikhailov has been appointed Metropolitan of Minsk and Slutsk — the highest office in the Belarusian Orthodox Church. Metropolitan Filaret of Minsk and Slutsk, patriarchal exarch of All Belarus, retired upon reaching the age of 75…

What the pope can do about anti-Christian persecution (National Catholic Reporter) Pope Francis addressed anti-Christian persecution recently, following attacks on two Christian churches in Baghdad that left at least 38 dead. In the abstract, it’s tempting to ask what any pope can do to affect anti-Christian persecution beyond issuing a cri de coeur. Both Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI raised the issue, and their rhetoric didn’t seem to put a dent in a scourge that claims somewhere between 9,000 and 100,000 lives every year. On the other hand, it was also once fashionable to ask what any pope could do about Communist persecution of Christians, until John Paul II played a key role in the collapse of the Soviet system across Eastern Europe. “For Christians this isn’t a surprise, because Jesus already announced [persecution] as a moment for offering witness,” Pope Francis said. “Nonetheless, on the civil plane, injustice ought to be denounced and eliminated.” Herewith are four things he could do to translate those words into action…

Russian Orthodox Church releases statement on events in Ukraine (Russian Orthodox Church) “We are aware that Ukrainian citizens have different views of the future of their country and we respect the right of the Ukrainian people to choose their own way. But it is very important that it should be precisely people’s choice, free and based on the awareness of all the pros and cons, not dictated by any external will. Let adherents to different versions of this choice speak with the people through peaceful and legitimate public processes and through a calm and responsible dialogue with each other. The church is ready to assist different social groups in this dialogue and in a search for right decisions…”

Second blast in two days hits Russia (New York Times) President Vladimir Putin ordered security to be tightened across Russia after a suicide bombing on a trolley bus in Volgograd killed at least 15 people and wounded dozens on Monday, the second bombing in the city in two days. The twin bombings appeared to be part of a deadly campaign of terror ahead of the Winter Olympics, which are scheduled to begin in six weeks in Sochi, a resort on the Black Sea only 400 miles away…

Palestinian Christians keep Christmas traditions alive (Haaretz) A Palestinian college student is one of the last keepers of a fading tradition — ringing the bells of Bethlehem. Twice a week, Khadir Jaraiseh climbs to the roof of the Church of the Nativity, built over the grotto where tradition says Jesus was born. He pulls the ropes of four bells in a rooftop tower for a total of 33 times to symbolize the number of years Jesus was believed to have lived. Jaraiseh rings the bells for prayer services of the Armenian Apostolic Church, one of three denominations that administer the basilica, one of Christianity’s holiest shrines. The Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox denominations at the Nativity church — each of which has its own set of bells — have switched to automatic bell ringing systems. But there’s something special about the traditional approach, said Jaraiseh, who uses both hands and a floor pedal to pull the ropes…

Egyptian bishop: Violence will not stop referendum on new constitution (CNS) A 26 December attack in Cairo and other violence will not keep Egypt from going ahead with its planned referendum on a new constitution, said Coptic Catholic Bishop Antonios Aziz Mina of Giza, Egypt. “These explosions will not prevent the mass mobilization for the referendum on the constitution. On the contrary, they increase our determination … to follow through with advancing the nation,” Bishop Mina told the Egyptian online newspaper, Al Youm al Sabea, after an explosion hit a Cairo bus, wounding five people…

Al Jazeera journalists arrested in Egypt (Al Jazeera) Egypt’s security forces have arrested four Al Jazeera journalists in Cairo. Correspondent Peter Greste, producers Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed as well as cameraman Mohamed Fawzy are being held in custody after arrested by security forces on Sunday evening. Human rights groups say conditions for journalists in Egypt have become difficult since former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi was removed in a coup on July 3, 2013…



Tags: Egypt Pope Francis Violence against Christians Russia Belarus

23 December 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Sister Adele Brambilla, C.M.S., directs the Italian Hospital in Kerak, Jordan, which provides affordable treatment to those most in need — including refugees from Syria and Iraq. To read more about this institution, read Overwhelming Mercy, from the Autumn issue of ONE. (photo: John E. Kozar)

Comboni sister sees hope in the eyes of Syrian refugees (AsiaNews) From the Italian Hospital in Kerak, Jordan, Comboni Missionary Sister Adele Brambilla describes the daily life of Syrian refugees. Thousands of families camp with nothing to keep them warm in the cold winter; treatable diseases are killing children. “Despite everything, hope is not dead,” Sister Adele says. “It is the refugees who are telling us that it is still alive. And those called to work together regardless of race, religion and beliefs are also holding it high so that human solidarity may still have a human face…”

Bulgaria, unready, is poor host to Syrians (New York Times) As the poorest member of the 28-nation European Union, Bulgaria has struggled to provide even rudimentary shelter to Syrian refugees, who began surging into the country from Turkey last summer after neighboring Greece, previously a popular entry point to Europe, built a fence along its border and beefed up controls…

L’Arche workshop uses Bethlehem commodity to provide work for members (CNS) The workshop Ma’an lil-Hayat is part of the international L’Arche network founded in 1964 by Canadian Catholic philosopher and theologian Jean Vanier for people with intellectual disabilities. This institution takes a local resource closely associated with the Christmas story but normally squandered — sheeps’ wool — and uses it to bring dignity and recognition to a population often overlooked and hidden in Palestinian society…

Brotherhood prisoners launch hunger strike in Egypt (Daily Star Lebanon) More than 450 imprisoned Muslim Brotherhood members launched a hunger strike Monday over their “inhuman treatment” after being jailed following the military’s overthrow of Egyptian president Mohammad Morsi, the group said…

Ukraine opposition forms political bloc, urges more protests (Al Jazeera) Seeking to consolidate their protest movement, leaders of major Ukrainian opposition parties demonstrating against the government of President Viktor Yanukovich said Sunday that they are establishing a nationwide political movement called Maidan (“Independence”), a reference to the square in Kiev that has been a major rallying area for the protests…

Still defiant, members of Russia’s Pussy Riot band go free (Los Angeles Times) Two members of the feminist punk-rock band Pussy Riot were freed from prison Monday after serving most of their two-year sentences for hooliganism, a charge that stemmed from the “punk prayer” they performed denouncing President Vladimir Putin in Moscow’s main Russian Orthodox cathedral in February 2012. The Moscow Patriarchate of the Russian Orthodox Church expressed satisfaction with the amnesty and offered a gesture of conciliation. “We are happy they were released and although we denounced their blasphemous act, we never insisted that they should have been put in prison to begin with, but it is the way the law is,” Vladimir Vigilyansky, spokesman for the Moscow Patriarchate, said in an interview…



Tags: Ukraine Refugees Bulgaria Italian Hospital Comboni Sisters

20 December 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




In this 2007 photo, a man sits in a hospital in Dahouk, Iraq, beside a victim of a suicide bombing targeting the ancient Yazidi religious sect in northwestern Iraq. (photo: CNS/Azad Lashkari, Reuters)

The Syrian refugees who know they can’t go home (Al Jazeera) Across the Middle East, Syrian refugees dream of returning to the homes they were forced from by war — but not 38-year-old Suleiman Rasho. Rasho is a Yazidi, a member of a small, ancient sect with roots in Iraq that has long been persecuted for a belief system far removed from other religions in the region. “It is impossible for Yazidis in the Middle East,” he said. “I do not think I will be able to go back to Syria.” In the Middle East, the Yazidis’ small numbers mean they have little command over their destiny and have to rely on others for protection. As extremist groups increase their hold on parts of war-torn Syria, and Iraq edges closer to a civil war of its own, many Yazidis find themselves in a familiar spot: trying to flee or waiting in fear…

Bishop Audo: Our Christmas under the bombs (Fides) For days, the rebel-controlled suburbs of Aleppo have endured bombing by the government air force. According to various sources, the military offensive has already caused more than 200 deaths. “In the meantime,” says Chaldean Jesuit Bishop Antoine Audo of Aleppo, “in the central areas of the city, mortar fire coming from the outlying areas in the hands of the rebels continue, and continue to cause casualties. Sometimes we hear from afar the thunder of the bombing of the army, but we do not have reliable information with regards to the effects of that offensive. The power shortages do not allow you to connect to the internet or watch television. And of course there are no newspapers…”

Patriarch: Amid crises, Christmas is the Middle East’s real hope (AsiaNews) On his first Christmas as patriarch, Chaldean Patriarch Louis Raphael will address the Christians of Iraq and the Middle East, discussing the situation in Iraq, on the suffering of the Christian community as well as the whole population. The message will call upon the faithful to welcome others through solidarity, unity and hope. An advance copy of the message is included below…

Homs bishop makes an appeal for release of Maaloula nuns (AsiaNews) Negotiations for the release of the Greek Orthodox nuns from Maaloula continue, following their abduction by Islamic extremists from the Ahrar al Qalamoun Brigade on 2 December. “Some contacts have been established with the kidnappers,” said Archbishop Mario Zenari, papal nuncio to Damascus, “but there are no reports at present about their possible release.” Syriac Orthodox Metropolitan Selwanos Boutros Alnemeh of Homs and Hama, made an appeal on 11 December for their release, slamming the serious crime. “We’ve now reached the point where even nuns are being abducted. What have they done wrong?” the prelate asked. In his view, “the abductors want to demonstrate that they show no mercy…”

Cardinal Koch: Reconciling churches in Ukraine calls for mutual recognition (RISU) The conflict between Greek Catholics and Orthodox in western Ukraine has to be resolved from both sides, said Cardinal Kurt Koch, head of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity. “Only by recognizing this can we move together into the future,” he said on December 17, responding to journalists’ questions at a press conference in Moscow. “I agree with Metropolitan Hilarion: The situation in Ukraine is very serious. But from my point of view, it has two sides, and Metropolitan Hilarion willingly speaks only of one. I have visited many parishes in Western Ukraine and saw the suffering on both sides…”



Tags: Refugees Syrian Civil War Sisters Dialogue Chaldean Patriarch Louis Raphael I

19 December 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




This 13 December photo depicts one of the flooded neighborhoods of Gaza. (photo: CNS/Mohammed Salem, Reuters)

Floods, rain threaten to make Christmas even more difficult in Gaza (CNS) The snowstorms and torrential rain that battered the Middle East in mid-December threatened to make this Christmas season an especially difficult one for Christians in Gaza. While the northern part of the Gaza Strip saw floods that left thousands of families homeless, 10,000 people evacuated from their homes and essential hospital personnel traveling to work by boat, most of the Gaza Strip’s tiny Christian community and its institutions are located in Gaza City itself and were saved from the worst of the storm, said Sami El-Yousef, CNEWA’s regional director for Palestine and Israel…

Interactive: Syria’s refugee children (Al Jazeera) More than 1.1 million Syrian children struggle to build a new life away from all they’ve ever known, confronting pain, isolation, separation and more…

Radical Islamist group gaining prominence in Syria (Der Spiegel) Once a branch of Al Qaeda, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) broke away from the successors of Osama bin Laden and now stands as a terrifying force in its own right. Infamous for its brutal tactics, ISIS is responsible for hundreds of kidnappings, with victims including activists, the chair of the city council of Raqqa, the heads of the civilian opposition, an Italian Jesuit and six European journalists. Anyone who opposes the ISIS fighters, or who is simply viewed as an infidel, disappears…

Ukrainian Orthodox Moscow Patriarchate disagrees with sister churches on protests (Pravoslavie.ru) A representative of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church-Patriarchate of Moscow has called upon the protesters in Maidan Square in Kiev to disperse. “Those who are now standing on Maidan are just ‘scoring points,’ ” said Metropolitan Paul of Vyshgorod and Chernobyl, abbot of the Kiev Caves Lavra. “Neither Europe nor Russia will help us, until we change ourselves. Moreover, talks on European integration are needed not by the people, but by those who are thirsting to rule over the people…”

Maronite patriarch reaches out to Middle East youth via Twitter (Fides) Maronite Patriarch Bechara Peter posted his first tweet on Wednesday via his new account, @bkerkejeune. “Dear youth,” he said in his message, delivered in Arabic, “I see in you the hope and future of the church. I believe you have the power to rejuvenate the church and your communities.” This dispatch came as part of an evening meeting attended by Maronite youth…

Russian Orthodox patriarch voices solidarity with Catholic Church (Interfax) Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and All Russia has expressed support for many of Pope Francis’ views. “In the positions of the bishop of Rome and the patriarch of Moscow, there is a lot in common regarding issues that are sources of concern for many people,” he said. As examples of such concurrence, he cited the two churches’ positions on persecutions of Christians in the Middle East and family affairs. He said dialogue between the Orthodox and Catholic churches is essential today…

Iraq’s sectarian militias assume larger role (Al Monitor) Sunni and Shiite militias across Iraq maintain an iron fist over the daily affairs of Iraqi citizens. Militiamen in Iraq do not only carry weapons, they also wield religious, moral and economic power over their social environment. They play the role of neighborhood governors in times of peace and assassins in times of war. In the absence of the rule of law, residents are increasingly relying on such figures to provide security…



Tags: Ukraine Refugees Syrian Civil War Gaza Strip/West Bank Maronite Patriarch Bechara Peter

18 December 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




In this photo from Christmas Day, 2011, Latin Patriarch Fouad Twal of Jerusalem carries a figurine of the baby Jesus as he celebrates Christmas Mass at St. Catherine’s Church in the West Bank town of Bethlehem. (photo: CNS/Reuters)

Jerusalem patriarch says Settlement construction ‘hampers’ peace (Daily Star Lebanon) Middle East peace efforts are being “hampered” by Israeli settlement construction, the Latin patriarch of Jerusalem said Wednesday in his traditional Christmas message. “The Israeli-Palestinian talks resumed in late July, after three years of interruption, but the efforts are hampered by the continuous building of Israeli settlements,” said Patriarch Fouad Twal. “As long as this problem is not resolved, the people of our region will suffer…”

Archbishop Nassar: Syrian children envy the stable where Jesus was born (Fides) “In Syria, thousands of children who have lost their homes are living in poor tents just like the stable in Bethlehem,” says Maronite Archbishop Samir Nassar of Damascus. In a touching message of Christmas reflection, the archbishop expresses with strong images the feelings shared by many Syrian Christians in front of yet another Christmas of war approaching. “The Syrian children … dream of being in Jesus’ place, who always had his parents around him. … [Jesus] found a stable in which to be born and have shelter, while among these unfortunate children there are those who were born under the bombs…”

Turkish minister to Armenians: Return to Turkey (Fides) Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, in a recent meeting with a well-known Armenian political representative, suggested the possibility of opening the doors of Turkey to the descendants of Armenian families who fled from the Turkish territory after the anti-Armenian pogrom in 1915. Davutoglu also outlined a scenario in which Armenians whose family roots lie in the Anatolian region are also cleared for return…

Ukraine, Russia seal trade deal (Vatican Radio) Ukraine and Russia have signed a major economic trade deal, despite massive protests in Kiev for European Union integration. Moscow has promised massive financial assistance and cuts in natural gas prices. Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych and his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin signed an agreement that has slashed the cost of natural gas sold to Ukraine by one-third. Moscow has also pledged to buy billions of dollars’ worth of Ukrainian government bonds, as the country faces a major economic crisis…

As pressure builds, Egypt’s police feeling threatened (New York Times) Since the military ouster more than five months ago of President Muhammad Morsi, the interim leaders have leaned heavily on the police, sending them to stamp out dissent and stabilize the streets in a strategy that so far has come up empty. Over the last three years of revolt, protesters have refused to be silenced, even when the authorities use deadly force. And Egypt has also become far more dangerous for the authorities, with more than 150 police officers killed since mid-August alone. The attacks have affected police morale, officers said, and raised troubling questions about the government’s ability to secure the country in the face of increasingly frequent attacks by militants…



Tags: Ukraine Turkey Armenia Maronite Church Patriarch Fouad Twal

17 December 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




In this September photo, a Syrian boy sits beside his family’s belongings as they wait for a vehicle to pick them up after entering Turkey from the Turkish Cilvegozu border gate. (photo: CNS/Umit Bektas, Reuters)

Eighteen stories from the Syrian exodus (Washington Post) In October, Kevin Sullivan and Linda Davidson set off for Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon to report on the Syrian refugee crisis, one of the largest forced migrations since World War II. The pair’s goal was to document the size and complexity of the crisis, showing its effects on the lives of individual refugees as well as the lasting impacts on the countries hosting them. They broke the crisis down into 18 personal stories of a wide range of refugees…

Patriarch warns against shrinking Georgian government authority (Eurasianet) The powerful Georgian Orthodox Church again has revived a fierce debate over whether or not it should act, essentially, as Georgia’s fourth branch of government. This time around, Patriarch Ilia II, the church’s revered, 80-year-old leader, has weighed into the seemingly secular issue of regional self-governance with a warning that the government’s plans to grant greater autonomy to Georgia’s regions could lead to “the disintegration of Georgia.” In a 4 December remark, the patriarch cautioned that devolution of authority could encourage more separatism, a phenomenon that already haunts Georgia with Abkhazia and South Ossetia…

Winter storm causes humanitarian catastrophe in Gaza (Al Monitor) A wave of extreme low pressure hit Palestinian territories on 10 December, amid cold winds that continued for several days. Heavy rain caused a major humanitarian disaster in the Gaza Strip, flooding hundreds of houses in various provinces and neighborhoods, injuring dozens of people and closing a number of main and side streets. According to the Ministry of Information in Gaza, 4,000 families were forced to leave their homes due to the extreme cold, and the government has offered in-kind assistance for 3,000 families…

Pope Francis celebrates mass with 4 homeless men on his 77th birthday (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis turned 77 today, celebrating Mass with 4 homeless men, his closest collaborators and staff from the guesthouse, all of whom afterwards greeted him with a birthday song…

U.S.C.C.B. announces day of prayer for those affected by human trafficking (Vatican Radio) The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has announced that its Committee on Migration has designated 8 February as an annual day of prayer for survivors and victims of human trafficking. According to its statement, 8 February is the feast day of St. Josephine Bakhita, who was kidnapped as a child and sold into slavery in Sudan and Italy. Once Josephine was freed, she dedicated her life to sharing her testament of deliverance from slavery and comforting the poor and suffering…



Tags: Syria Pope Francis Refugees Georgian Orthodox Church U.S.C.C.B.

16 December 2013
Greg Kandra




In this image from March 2013, Cardinal Kurt Koch, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, arrives for general congregation meetings at the Vatican. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)

Cardinal Koch to meet Russian Orthodox Patriarch (Vatican Radio) The president of the Pontifical Council for Christian Unity, Cardinal Kurt Koch, heads off to Russia on Saturday for a visit being seen as an important milestone on the road towards reconciliation between the Catholic and Russian Orthodox churches. The Swiss cardinal will spend five days in St. Petersburg and Moscow, celebrating with the small Catholic communities there, as well as meeting with Russian Orthodox bishops, priests and seminarians…

United Nations launches record appeal for Syria (BBC) The United Nations has announced its biggest ever appeal, seeking $6.5 billion for humanitarian aid to Syria. The U.N. estimates nearly three-quarters of Syria’s 22.4 million population will need humanitarian aid in 2014. The appeal coincides with a new study by the International Rescue Committee, which warns that starvation is now threatening the Syrian population. Bread prices have risen by 500 percent in some areas, according to the report. Four out of five Syrians said their greatest worry was that food would run out, the survey found…

Retired patriarch expresses sympathy for demonstrators in Ukraine (ByzCath.org) The retired leader of the Ukrainian Catholic Church has said the Ukrainian government should be “dishonored for what it does.” Cardinal Lubomyr Husar expressed sympathy for anti-government demonstrators who have occupied some buildings in the nation’s capital, protesting moves to withdraw from the European community and ally more closely with Russia. The demonstrators have acted “very sensitively,” Cardinal Husar told an interviewer. “The government should thank God that the people behave as they do, because it could be worse…”

U.N. plans to resettle thousands of Ethiopian refugees (Sudan Tribune) The United Nations refugee agency said on Friday that it is planning to resettle over 3,800 refugees in Ethiopia to a third country. This follows record submissions for resettlement at the Tongo, Barahle and Bokolmanyo refugee camps, where resettlement has not not been previously conducted. “Notable this year was the first emergency resettlement to Sweden of a child-at-risk from Dollo Ado, as well as submissions of several highly vulnerable women and girls out of Barahle and Sherkole camps, including victims of female genital mutilation and other forms of sexual and gender based violence,” said Julia Zajkowski, the resettlement officer at UNHCR’s Ethiopia office. The plan to resettle 3,800 refugees exceeds the U.N. refugee agency’s 2013 resettlement target by over 20 percent…



Tags: Syria Ukraine Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church United Nations Cardinal Kurt Koch

13 December 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Police surround Christian demonstrators during a march advocating for rights for low-caste Christians in New Delhi on 11 December. (photo: CNS/Anto Akkara)

Indian prime minister apologizes after Christian marchers beaten (Catholic Herald) Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh apologized to church leaders for the police beating of protesters — including priests and nuns — during a march advocating for rights for low-caste Christians…

Israel’s divided government scraps controversial Bedouin relocation plan (Al Jazeera) Israel is scrapping a controversial draft law that would have forced the relocation of tens of thousands of native Bedouin residents of the Negev desert, an official said Thursday. The move — which is known as the Prawer Plan and would have ordered the demolition of about 40 so-called unrecognized Bedouin villages in the Negev and the relocation of between 30,000 and 40,000 people — passed a preliminary ministerial vote in January. The Association for Civil Rights in Israel said Bedouin communities in the Negev face discrimination within Israeli society. More than 160,000 Bedouin live in unrecognized villages in the Negev, where the state does not provide basic services like water and electricity…

Orthodox bishop denies urging Christians to take up arms (Fides) Metropolitan Lukas al Koury of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch categorically denies inciting Syrian Christian youth to take up arms in the conflict that has bloodied the country, and asserts that the declarations attributed to him by the media “are false.” In a note sent to Fides, Metropolitan Lukas urges everyone to be wary of those newspapers manipulating stories for political ends…

Syrian extremist rebels target journalists (Der Spiegel) Radical Islamists embedded among the rebels in Syria are reportedly targeting foreign journalists for abduction. Instead of holding them for ransom, however, they use them as trump cards in their power struggles with more moderate rebel groups. On Tuesday, Ayman Mhanna, executive director of the Beirut-based SKeyes Center for Media and Cultural Freedom, said that 20 foreign journalists are being held captive in Syria. Some of the missing journalists are in the hands of the regime, he added, but the majority are captives of extremist groups…

Syria: U.S. and Britain call a halt to equipping rebels (AsiaNews) The United States and Britain have suspended the shipping of non-lethal supplies — armored vehicles, communications gear, etc. — to Syrian rebels, but will continue to send humanitarian aid. London and Washington have decided to sever ties with the rebels because of the continued growth of radical Islamist groups…



Tags: Syrian Civil War Israel Indian Christians Bedouin Dalits

12 December 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Christian demonstrators are taken away in a police bus on 11 December after being arrested during a march advocating for rights for low-caste Christians in New Delhi. The following day, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh apologized to church leaders for police beating some demonstrators during the march. (photo: CNS/Anto Akkara)

Archbishop of Delhi arrested while marching for Dalits’ rights (Fides) Archbishop Anil Couto of Delhi was arrested today by the Delhi police along with other Christian bishops and leaders of other denominations. The archbishop was participating, along with other leaders and many lay faithful of Christian churches, in a peaceful march to protest for the rights of the Dalits. The protesters had arrived in the area of Jantar Mantar and were heading towards the Indian Parliament. The police responded by beating and arresting many protesters. A complaint has been lodged against the Delhi police for assaulting priests and nuns…

Pope: Human trafficking a crime against humanity (VIS) Trafficking in human beings, a real form of slavery which affects all countries, including the most developed, was the theme chosen by Pope Francis in his address to 16 new non-resident ambassadors and one diplomatic representative to the Holy See. The Holy Father spoke about the numerous initiatives undertaken by the international community to promote peace, dialogue, cultural relations, politics and economics, as well as aid to populations affected by difficulties of various types, and went on to consider the question of trafficking in human beings which “affects the most vulnerable people in society: women, children, the disabled, the poorest and those who come from situations of family or social disintegration…”

Safety of journalists in Syria under the spotlight (Vatican Radio) Major news organizations are becoming increasingly concerned about the safety of journalists reporting in Syria. Thirteen news outlets have sent a letter to the leadership of the armed opposition in Syria, calling for urgent action against rebel groups increasingly targeting journalists for kidnappings. The letter is in response to a sharp rise in the number of journalists while on assignment in opposition-held areas in northern Syria. Many of the abduction cases go unreported at the request of families or employers in the hope that keeping the kidnappings out of public view may help with negotiating the captives’ release…

For Syrian refugees in Lebanon, winter brings challenges (Washington Post) The United Nations said Wednesday that it is “extremely concerned” for Syria’s refugees as snow and freezing temperatures descended on the region. Syria and the countries that border it have been bracing for what is expected to be the worst winter storm in years. Snow hit some areas of Lebanon, Turkey and northern Syria overnight Tuesday as sharp winds and cold, heavy rains battered others, causing misery for hundreds of thousands in camps and shanties. In Lebanon, despite the wintry conditions, the flow of Syrians fleeing the war is unrelenting…

E.U. official: Ukraine’s Yanukovych will sign trade deal (USA Today) A European Union official said Thursday that Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych intends to sign an agreement with the European Union, but some of those protesting in support of the deal said that won’t stop their demonstrations. “If the deal is signed now, I won’t leave the protest,” said Dmitry Zhuk, 24, a Kiev resident who has joined the protests after his workday almost every day since they started last month. “I don’t think anyone will leave.” Experts and the protesters themselves said that in the wake of a violent crackdown that broadened the protesters’ demands, they are unlikely to immediately disperse. “At first, it was indeed the protest for signing the association agreement with E.U., but after what happened — all the force used against protesters — only someone who is completely ignorant can say, ’O.K., now everything will change to the best’ and go home,” Mr. Zhuk said…

Ethiopian-born Israeli lawmaker spurned at blood-collection drive (Al Jazeera) The speaker of Israel’s parliament ordered a blood-collection crew to leave the legislature’s premises on Wednesday after it turned down an offer of a blood donation from an Ethiopian-born lawmaker. Knesset member Pnina Tamano-Shata, 32, wanted to donate blood to a routine visit by an ambulance service but was told by a member of the crew that set criteria disqualified her because she emigrated to Israel from Ethiopia at age 3. “Under health ministry directives, we are unable to accept blood from donors of Ethiopian Jewish origin,” the health official was reported to have said as he spurned the donation. Israeli President Shimon Peres expressed disgust at the incident, saying: “There must not be any differentiation between Israeli people’s blood. All Israel’s citizens are equal…”



Tags: Ukraine Refugees Indian Christians human trafficking Dalits

11 December 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky’s ecumenical legacy lives on in the Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern Christian Studies, in St. Paul University, Ottawa, Canada. (video: Sheptytsky Institute)

Russian government brands 113-year-old Sheptytsky sermon ‘extremist’ (Christian Today) Russian officials from the Meshchansky District Court in Moscow recently labeled the text of a sermon preached in 1900 by Ukrainian Greek Catholic Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky as “extremist.” This means its distribution is banned all across Russia and ownership of it can now result in criminal prosecution, according to a report by Forum 18 news agency. Archbishop Sheptytsky is currently a candidate for Sainthood in the Catholic Church because of his work in rescuing Jews from the Nazis. The sermon in question, which is entitled “The True Faith” (”Pravdiva Vira,” in its original language), was one of 16 Ukrainian-language texts initially deemed “extreme” by the Meshchansky District Court back in March this year. Ownership of this text could now result in a jail sentence of three years, and a fine of 300,000 Rubles (around $9,000)…

Archbishop: Inciting Christians to take up arms is ‘insane’ (Fides) “As men of the church, we cannot incite Christians to take up arms and to take part in the conflict. We cannot say these things. It is insane. It goes against the Gospel and the Christian doctrine,” said Syriac Catholic Archbishop Jacques Behnan Hindo of the eparchy of Hassake-Nisibis. His words are a response to recent statements made by Greek Orthodox Bishop Lukas al Khoury, according to whom “every young Christian in a position to do so should take up arms to protect Syria, churches and convents.” Archbishop Jacques adds: “We are against violence, from whatever side it comes. … Moreover, such reckless statements put Christians in danger of becoming targets of violence…”

Pan-Orthodox gathering in Munich (Serbian Orthodox Church) On the feast day of the Presentation of the Most Holy Theotokos, Serbian Orthodox Patriarch Irinej celebrated the Divine Liturgy in the church of St. Jovan Vladimir in Munich. Concelebrating were Russian Orthodox Archbishop Marko of Berlin, Romanian Orthodox Metropolitan Seraphim of Central and Northern Europe and Antiochene Orthodox Bishop Sophian of Kronstadt…

Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church issues statement on events in Kiev (Vatican Radio) “We are profoundly disturbed by the actions of the state security forces on the Maydan Square in heart of Kiev, conducted under the cover of the night.” In a statement issued Wednesday, the Permanent Synod of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church has strongly denounced the police action against protestors in Kyiv’s “Independence Square.” The statement, signed by Major Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk and the members of the permanent synod, condemned “the action directed towards restricting civil liberties, especially the freedom of expression and peaceful civic manifestation of the citizens of Ukraine…”

Lebanon worries housing will incentivize Syrian refugees stay (New York Times) The modest shelter housing some Syrian refugees here, a few hundred yards south of the border with Syria, hardly looks objectionable. Made of plywood walls on a concrete foundation of some 250 square feet, with one door, two windows and a corrugated zinc roof, the squat structure is called a “box shelter.” But Lebanon has banned box shelters, regarding them as a threat to this already fragile nation. In the eyes of the Lebanese, the box shelters, made by the Danish Refugee Council, look too permanent and could encourage the Syrians to stay. Of the many factors complicating the world’s response to the Syrian refugee crisis, perhaps none are more peculiar to the Middle East than Lebanon’s deep-seated fear of permanence…

Pope Francis: Person of the Year (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis has been named Time Magazine’s Person of the Year for 2013. He is the third Catholic pontiff to receive this honor, after John XXIII in 1962 and John Paul II in 1994…



Tags: Pope Francis Ukraine Syrian Civil War Russia Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church





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