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December, 2017
Volume 43, Number 4
  
5 October 2011
Erin Edwards




A young girl walks along a decorated wall as she joins her friends before the start of their first communion ceremony, in the Dbayeh Palestinian refugee camp, on the northern outskirts of Beirut, Lebanon. (photo: Dalia Khamissy)

The Pontifical Mission, our operating agency in the Middle East, has provided much support for the Dbayeh refugee camp in Beirut over the years. With the help of The Little Sisters of Nazareth, Dbayeh camp has set itself apart from most Palestinian refugee camps:

Across from the UNRWA office, in the partially derelict school compound that Pontifical Mission, in partnership with UNRWA, built, funded and once administered, 10 youngsters were sitting in a semicircle rehearsing their First Communion. All wore white cassocks; wooden crosses hung around their necks while the girls wore gardenias in their hair. Men and women stood by, offering moral support. Among them was Sister Anita, a Little Sister of Nazareth, a community inspired by the French hermit Blessed Charles de Foucauld. While her two colleagues in Dbayeh are Belgian, Sister Anita is a native of Bshirri, a village in north Lebanon.

The Little Sisters of Nazareth have had a family of three nuns stationed in Lebanon since 1971. Sister Anita and Sister Rosa have served for four years, while Sister Joanna arrived a year ago, though she has long experience in Lebanon. Based first in Jisr el Basha, the sisters left Lebanon briefly for the safety of Jordan after the camp was razed in 1976. But in 1978, the Pontifical Mission approached the sisters and, to ease their return, offered living quarters in Dbayeh.

For more about the Dbayeh refugee camp, check out Defining Dbayeh in the September 2007 issue of ONE.



Tags: Lebanon Refugee Camps Palestinians Beirut Palestinian Refugees