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Current Issue
December, 2017
Volume 43, Number 4
  
4 October 2017
Greg Kandra




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Father Tom Uzhunnalil, freed last month after over a year in captivity in Yemen, will receive the Mother Teresa Award for Social Justice in Mumbai. (photo: Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images)

Kidnapped Indian priest to get Mother Teresa award (Vatican Radio) Father Tom, recently freed after 18 months captivity in Yemen, has been named this year’s recipient of the Mother Teresa Award for Social Justice by Harmony Foundation Mumbai. Abraham Mathai, founder of Harmony Foundation said Father Tom exemplifies the year’s theme “Compassion Beyond Borders — a compassionate response to the refugee crisis.” Father Tom he said continued to work at a place of great danger despite having had the chance to leave the country...

Kurdish referendum could imperil Christian safe haven in Iraq (National Catholic Register) The Kurdish referendum vote for independence from Iraq has raised the specter of all-out war that, Middle East Christian leaders and advocates warn, could land the final blow to the future of Christianity in its historic Mesopotamian homeland...

Russia says airstrips wounded Al Quaida leader in Syria (AP) Russia’s military announced on Wednesday that it has carried out airstrikes in Syria this week that critically wounded the leader of the country’s al-Qaida-linked group and killed 12 other militant commanders...

Archeologists believe they have discovered tomb of St. Nicholas (The Telegraph) Archaeologists in Turkey have made a discovery which could settle a century-old debate ... and disappoint millions of children around the world. They have unearthed what they say is likely the tomb of the original Santa Claus, or Saint Nicholas, beneath an ancient church in Demre, southern Turkey...

The town that gave Russia its name (BBC) One hundred years ago, revolution flung Russia from the imperialist era into the communist era — from centuries of tsars to red Soviet stars. In St Petersburg, extravagant palaces recall the lavish lifestyles of the Russian emperors, while in Moscow, austere skyscrapers are reminders of the stark existence under dictatorial rule. Even though it’s been a century since Russians found themselves at the crossroads between these two major phases of their nation’s history, many are still at odds with one another over which period — and which city — had the greatest impact on today’s Russian culture and sparked citizens’ profound patriotism...



3 October 2017
CNEWA staff




Sami El-Yousef served for eight years as CNEWA’s regional director for Palestine and Israel. In September, he became Chief Executive Officer of the Latin Patriarchate. (photo: Don Duncan)

CNEWA’s former regional director for Palestine and Israel, Sami El-Yousef, has taken the reins as the Chief Executive Officer of the Latin Patriarchate —the first lay person to hold the position.

An interview with him was just posted on the patriarchate’s website:

What do you hope that this change will bring to our diocese?

It was a great honor to be asked to be the first lay administrator to assume the position of Chief Executive Officer of the Latin Patriarchate. Though there has been a trend within the universal church to turn over such responsibilities to lay leadership, on our local scene which is overburdened with history and tradition this constitutes a major and historic change. It is my hope and dream that this change will bear fruit and the emerging partnership and shared responsibility between the religious and lay leadership will lead the Latin Patriarchate to new highs and position it ideally to serve our local community. Thus, teamwork will be key in the coming period as no one can succeed alone without the collective efforts of all our committed staff and collaborators.

Throughout your professional career, you assumed many positions within the institutions of the Catholic Church in the Holy Land, could you talk to us about your background and work experiences?

By way of a personal introduction, I am a native of the Old City of Jerusalem and have worked for most of my professional career for the institutions of the Catholic Church in the Holy Land. After completing my university education in the United States, I returned to Palestine in 1980 and started working at Bethlehem University in various positions over two periods for a total of 24 years. There I assumed a number of responsibilities including teaching assistant; lecturer; dean of faculty of business administration; assistant vice president for academic affairs; and finally, the first lay person to assume the duties of vice president for finances and planning from 2000-2009. Feeling the heavy burden of administration and routine work, I moved to a new line of work as I joined the CNEWA — Pontifical Mission for Palestine (PMP) office team in Jerusalem in 2009 as the second lay regional director for Palestine and Israel. There I was exposed to humanitarian and development work and was involved in institutional support to tens of mostly Christian institutions providing quality services to marginalized communities in the sectors of education, health, and social services.

How will you incorporate your work experiences in your new duties as Chief Executive Officer at LPJ?

After eight years at CNEWA — PMP, I again felt that now is a time of change for me personally as I’m called to tackle the challenges and opportunities at the Latin Patriarchate given the nature of the services it offers. At LPJ, I will combine my administrative and financial management experience acquired at Bethlehem University along with the humanitarian and development experience of CNEWA — PMP. Not only is the Latin Patriarchate the local church with a diocese covering four countries in the Holy Land, but its services are rich through its many institutions of service in a number of sectors, most notably in the area of education through a network of 45 schools in Jordan, Israel and Palestine. In addition, we should not underestimate the humanitarian, medical, scholarship and pastoral support provided to thousands on an annual basis nor the centers that provide quality services ranging from senior citizens in Taybeh to severely disabled children in Amman to mention just a few.

Read more at the link.



3 October 2017
Greg Kandra




Slewa Shamoon Aba displays a broken crucifix in the garden of his home. With the exit of ISIS, many Iraqi Christians are returning to their homes and villages and trying to rebuild.
(photo: Raed Rafei)


In the September 2017 edition of ONE, photojournalist Raed Rafei visits once-displaced Iraq Christians who are returning to home and having to make some Hard Choices:

Iraq’s largest Christian city, Qaraqosh served as a commercial hub for the entire region of the Nineveh Plain. Since the landmines were cleared and the area was declared safe in April, some 500 families have returned — a fraction of the pre-war population of 50,000.

Yet the simple fact that they are here tells a story of resilience, determination and faith.

In a once-bustling commercial neighborhood known simply as Al Souk (Arabic for “market”), locals have begun the mammoth task of clearing away rubble. With a shovel in hand and a black hat, Bahnam Matti, 72, removes detritus from what had been a clothes shop, now desolate with large holes in the ceiling. Every now and then, he pauses to wipe the sweat off his face with a pink towel placed on his shoulder.

Across the street, a woman in a bright red and blue dress sprays water from a hose on the entrance of her scorched restaurant. Others paint walls or cut wood panels, undaunted by the scale of destruction — scores of collapsed rooftops, smashed storefronts and hills of accumulated debris.

...Despite some shy rebuilding efforts by churches and homeowners, the estimated $70 million needed for the overall reconstruction of Qaraqosh still looms large. Several organizations have pledged to help with large finances, but substantial aid has not materialized yet.

The condition of Qaraqosh is not very different from that of most Christian towns in the Nineveh Plain, which typically report damage to 30 to 40 percent of structures — houses, schools, public institutions, churches, monasteries and hospitals alike.

But some towns, such as Batnaya, have been rendered completely uninhabitable, reporting 85 percent of buildings demolished under heavy aerial bombardment

Read more — and check out the video below.




3 October 2017
Greg Kandra




ISIS claims responsibility for deadly suicide attack in Syria (AP) The Islamic State group on Tuesday claimed responsibility for a pair of suicide bombings in the Syrian capital that killed 17 civilians and policemen the previous day. In Monday’s bombings, two men attacked a police station in the al-Midan neighborhood with several bombs, before one of them blew himself up, according to Syria’s interior minister, Lt. Gen. Mohammad al-Shaar. He said the other bomber made it inside the compound, where police killed him, causing his bomb to explode...

Kurdistan plans elections next month (Reuters) Iraq’s autonomous Kurdistan region is calling presidential and parliamentary elections for 1 November, the Erbil-based Rudaw TV said on Tuesday, as the Kurdish leadership cements its case for independence...

Catholics mark Gandhi’s birthday in India (UCANews.com) Some 500 people — Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, Buddhists and Christians — marched with lit candles through Bhopal in India on 2 October to mark the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, father of the Indian nation, stressing his ideals of non-violence. Bhopal Archdiocese, based in the capital of Madhya Pradesh state, organized the march that culminated in an inter-religious prayer gathering. The event marked the 148th birth anniversary of Gandhi, who led India’s struggle for freedom from British rule while advocating non-violent methods. Archbishop Leo Cornelio of Bhopal who addressed the prayer gathering said the program was part of the church’s efforts to promote “inter-religious harmony and peace” in the state...

Russian Orthodox church takes aim at film about Tsar’s affair (Hollywood Reporter) Hundreds of billboards affirming the tsar’s love for his empress have been welcomed by director of controversial film ‘Matilda.’ In the latest salvo in a dispute over a Russian film about the last tsar’s affair with a ballerina, the Russian Orthodox Church has put up 300 billboards in Moscow displaying what it called “words about love” exchanged between the tsar and his wife...



Tags: Iraq India Russian Orthodox ISIS

2 October 2017
Greg Kandra




Students at the Father Roberts Institute in Lebanon study ecology in a greenhouse area. Learn how the church is serving these young people and others by Reaching the Margins in the
September 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: Don Duncan)




2 October 2017
Greg Kandra




Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle of Manila, president of Caritas Internationalis, prays that a young refugee he met in Greece has found someone willing to “share the journey” with him. A leading Vatican official on Monday declared that immigration and health care are pro-life issues.
(video: CNS/YouTube)


Archbishop: Immigration, health care are pro-life issues (CNS) Pro-life issues cannot be restricted solely to bioethical concerns but must encompass a broader definition that defends life in every aspect, said Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia, president of the Pontifical Academy for Life. Speaking to journalists at the Vatican press office on 2 October, Archbishop Paglia said that to be pro-life, Christians must “rethink the semantic value of the word, ‘life’ and not just in a reduced way...”

Coordinated bombing strikes Damascus (Al Jazeera) More than 10 people have been killed in an apparently coordinated bombing in Syria’s capital Damascus, according to several sources. A car bomb went off near a police station in Damascus’s al-Midan neighborhood on Monday, shortly before two suicide bombers detonated their explosive belts, the UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR) said. The 11 dead included police officers and civilians, the SOHR said, adding that the attack also caused injuries...

Russian border guard killed in shootout near Ukraine border (Voice of America) Russia’s top domestic security agency says one Russian border guard has been killed in a shootout with two men who tried to cross into Ukraine. The FSB said in a statement Monday the two men on Saturday opened fire when the officer who approached them in a Russian village that borders northeast Ukraine. One of the men blew himself up and the other was detained. The border guard died of gunshot wounds...

Church of the Holy Sepulchre suffers roof collapse (Newsweek) Part of the of the roof of Jerusalem’s Church of the Holy Sepulchre collapsed Friday as hundreds of worshipers visited the site. The church, one of the holiest locations in the Christian faith, had to be closed in the wake of the collapse while officials made sure it was safe for the congregation to return...

Palestinian prime minister visits Gaza (The Washington Post) The Palestinian prime minister arrived in the Gaza Strip on Monday for the first time in years as part of a new attempt to reconcile with the militant group Hamas after a decade-long split...



Tags: Syria Ukraine Refugees Jerusalem Russia





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