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September, 2018
Volume 44, Number 3
  
9 July 2014
J.D. Conor Mauro




A Iraqi man looks into the nursery in Al Hayat, a 27-bed mother and child facility in Baghdad operated by the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena. To learn more about ways CNEWA has assisted Iraqi institutions like this hospital, read After the Storm, from the May-June 2003 issue of our magazine. To support this institution, click the image! (photo: Sherrlyn Borkgren)



Tags: Iraq Children Sisters Health Care Nursing

8 July 2014
J.D. Conor Mauro




A shepherd walks his flock out to graze in Deir Mimas village, in Lebanon. To read more about life in this region, read Rebuilding Southern Lebanon, from the November 2005 issue of ONE. (photo: Armineh Johannes)



Tags: Lebanon Village life Farming/Agriculture

7 July 2014
J.D. Conor Mauro




Bat-El Shmueli, an Ethiopian woman who has lived in Israel for more than two decades, works closely with the new Ethiopian community as a supervisor of the organization Ethiopian National Project in Haifa. Ms. Shmueli strives to build bridges between the Israeli and Ethiopian culture. She lives with her husband, a famous Israeli Sepahardic artist, in Ein Hod with their two children and her niece, who was orphaned in Ethiopia. To learn more about Ethiopian Jews in Israel, read Challenges for a Land of Immigrants, in the November 2008 issue of ONE. (photo: Ilene Perlman)



Tags: Israel Immigration Multiculturalism Ethiopian Jews

3 July 2014
J.D. Conor Mauro




Before moving to Jifna, a village in the West Bank 14 miles north of Jerusalem, the Rev. Firas Aridah was a pastor in the village of Aboud for six years. Over 1,600 acres of Aboud’s land were confiscated by the Israeli occupation for construction of two illegal settlements and a stretch of Israel’s separation wall. You can read more about forming priests in a land of conflict in the March 2011 issue of ONE. To learn more about Father Aridah, watch this video from our 2009 special feature on the priests of the regions CNEWA serves. (photo: Rich Wiles)



Tags: Middle East Holy Land Israeli-Palestinian conflict Holy Land Christians Priests

2 July 2014
J.D. Conor Mauro




Sister Najma chats with a patient visiting the clinic for a routine checkup at the Mother of Mercy Clinic in Zerqa, Jordan. The clinic is administered by the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena, an order of Iraqi nuns. Recently, ISIS extremists kidnapped two Iraqi Sisters of the Congregation of the Daughters of Mary Immaculate — Sister Atur and Sister Miskinta — along with three of the young charges of their foster home in Mosul. Please keep them in your prayers. To find out how you can help Iraq’s religious sisters, click here. (photo: Nader Daoud)



Tags: Iraq Children Violence against Christians Sisters Health Care

1 July 2014
J.D. Conor Mauro




A culinary student at the Youth Development Center in Gyumri, Armenia, cleans up after a class. The center is part of the Our Lady of Armenia Boghossian Educational Complex, administered by the Armenian Sisters of the Immaculate Conception. To learn more about how this institution offers orphaned youth in Armenia a brighter future, read From Isolation to Opportunity, from the March 2011 issue of ONE. (photo: Nazik Armenakyan)



Tags: Sisters Education Armenia Youth

30 June 2014
J.D. Conor Mauro




Ramiz Toma, an Iraqi Christian living in Sweden, attends the Divine Liturgy at least once a week. To learn more about the community of Iraqi Christian expatriates in Sweden, read A Nordic Refuge No More, from the May 2011 issue of ONE. (photo: Magnus Aronson)



Tags: Iraq Iraqi Christians Iraqi Refugees Emigration Sweden

27 June 2014
Greg Kandra




An Argentina fan wears a mask of Pope Francis as he attends the 2014 World Cup Group Final on 25 June between Argentina and Nigeria at the Beira Rio stadium in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Argentina defeated Nigeria, 3-2. (photo: CNS/Stefano Rellandini, Reuters)



26 June 2014
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2006, Metropolitan Nicholas presides at a liturgy in honor of Sts. Cyril and Methodius Church in Camp Nazareth, Mercer, Pennsylvania. To learn about the American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church, read our profile in the July 2006
issue of ONE
. (photo: Lisa Kyle)




25 June 2014
Greg Kandra




Making sfeeha from scratch is laborious, but well worth the effort. (photo: Ilene Perlman)

In Massachusetts, you can find a thriving enclave of Armenian culture, which we reported on in 2006:

At first glance, Watertown is not unlike many of the middle-class suburbs and small towns that have sprung up around Boston. Its most imposing building is the brick post office on Main Street, which is surrounded by an array of inconspicuous office buildings and stores. Take the New England accents away, and you could be anywhere in Small Town, U.S.A.

But look closer, especially along Mount Auburn Street, another of Watertown’s major thoroughfares. There you will find the offices of lawyer Ara H. Margosian II and optometrist J.C. Baboian, the Bedrojian Funeral Home and the St. James Armenian Apostolic Church. Armenian flags — tricolors of red, blue and orange — fly above filling stations. There is a cluster of specialty groceries, all more or less like the Sevan Bakery, which advertises “Fresh lahmejune daily” and displays a list of available dips: hommus, babagounesh, muhammara, yalangy, tabouleh and tarama. You would think Watertown, population 33,000, was founded by a group of Armenian gourmands, not 17th-century English settlers.

Like other immigrant communities, the 50,000 Armenian-Americans in the Boston area are bound together by several cultural factors. There is of course religion. In Watertown alone there are four Armenian churches — two Armenian Apostolic, a Catholic and an Evangelical — and several more within a short drive. There is also language, though this cultural glue is weakening as Armenians followed the historic assimilation patterns of other immigrant groups. And there is politics, particularly the galvanizing efforts to raise awareness about the Armenian genocide, which many believe has been an overlooked tragedy of the 20th century and one that Turkey has never fully acknowledged. Food might seem a less lofty social glue, but nonetheless it may be the most enduring. After all, very few drive to Watertown from New Hampshire or Vermont to attend a political rally or a Sunday liturgy. But they do come, and in droves, to stock their pantries and freezers.

Margaret Chauushian and her husband, Gabriel, bought the Sevan Bakery 22 years ago, five years after they moved to Watertown from Istanbul. The store is dominated by a long salad bar — actually, a salad bar that has been converted into a depository of dozens of different nuts: almonds, cashews, peanuts, toasted or fresh, unsalted or salted. In the back, several men and women were making fresh lahmejunes — a thin, spicy pizza — for which the bakery is best known. The store caters to Watertown’s 7,000 Armenian-Americans, Armenian-Americans who drive in from near and far and non-Armenians who have developed a taste for the food.

“Most of our customers are Armenian, of course, but we also have a lot of Jewish customers,” Mrs. Chauushian said. “Saturday is our busiest day. We have people who drive in from all over New England.”

Read more about where you can get A Taste of Little Armenia in the July 2006 issue of ONE.



Tags: Armenia





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