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December, 2017
Volume 43, Number 4
  
20 March 2015
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2009, Greek Catholic seminarians gather for morning worship in the chapel of the seminary in Hajdudorog, Hungary. (photo: Tivdar Domaniczky)

The Vatican today announced a reorganization of the Hungarian Greek Catholic Church, elevating it to a Metropolitan Church “sui juris.”

Vatican Radio explains:

[Pope Francis] has elevated the Eparchy of Hajdédorog for the Catholics of Byzantine Rite to a Metropolitan See, with a seat at Debrecen, and has nominated Bishop Fülöp Kocsis, until now Eparchal Bishop of Hajdédorog, as first Metropolitan;

The Pope also elevated the Apostolic Exarchate of Miskolc for Catholics of Byzantine Rite to an Eparchy, establishing it as a suffragen of the Metropolitan See of Hajdédorog, and has nominated Bishop Atanéz Orosz, who has been serving as Apostolic Exarch of Miskolc, as first Eparchal Bishop; and,

Erected the Eparchy of Nyíregyhéza for Catholics of Byzantine Rite, with territory taken from the Eparchy of Hajdúdorog, establishing it as a suffragen of the Metropolitan See of Hajdúdorog. Pope Francis has named Bishop Atanáz Orosz Apostolic Administrator sede vacante, of the new Eparchy.

We’ve done a number of stories on this church, including a profile in 2009 which examined it rich history and modern challenges:

With the collapse of the Iron Curtain, Hungary’s Greek Catholic Church surged to fill the void left after a half-century of despotic rule in Central and Eastern Europe. Led by Bishop Szilárd Keresztes, the Eparchy of Hajdúdorog collected icons, liturgical books, vestments and other sacramentals, which he immediately offered to the once banned Greek Catholic churches in Romania and Ukraine.

Because of its central location, Bishop Keresztes suggested the eparchial seminary — which is dedicated to St. Athanasius — should play a key role in the revival of Europe’s Greek Catholic churches. In 1990, he opened it to Romanians, Rusyns, Slovaks and Ukrainians interested in the priesthood. To improve the quality of the education offered there, the bishop invited an impressive number of foreign educated professors.

As a result, the theological faculty became an affiliate of the Pontifical Oriental Institute in Rome in 1995.

Formation of lay catechists also figured prominently in the life of the church soon after the collapse of communism. In 1992, the bishop signed an agreement with the Teachers Training College in Nyíregyháza and set up a corresponding department at the seminary for the formation of teachers.

The Hungarian Greek Catholic Church shares in the socioeconomic challenges affecting the country. Even as birthrates continue to fall, driving down the number of men and women entering priesthood and religious, the demands placed upon the church grow.

To learn more, read our profile and check out “Our Town” and “To Be a Priest” from earlier editions of the magazine, which give more details about the life and faith of Hungarian Greek Catholics.



19 March 2015
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2005, Vincent Njarekaden and Father Titus Kattuparambil review an anti-drug poster in Kerala. The church has been working to help people in India battle alcohol and drug addiction. To learn how, read “One Day At a Time in Kerala,” from the July 2005 edition of ONE.
(photo: Cody Christopulos)




18 March 2015
Greg Kandra




A mother from Samalut, Egypt, helps her son with his homework. To learn more about the particular challenges facing women in Egypt, read “Spotlight: Coptic Women” from the September 2011 edition of ONE. (photo: Holly Pickett)



16 March 2015
Greg Kandra




Greek Catholic seminarians in Hungary prepare the altar for the celebration of the Divine Liturgy.
(photo: Tivadar Domaniczky)


In 2007, we paid a visit to seminarians in northeastern Hungary:

Today’s seminarians are concerned about deteriorating communities, indifference, commercialism and a lack of family and community values. “People are not open enough with each other,” said Gyözö Balogh. “Maybe because they don’t know each other’s values and traditions, they have this fear.”

Gyözö Balogh is one of two Romany (more commonly known as Gypsy) Greek Catholic seminarians and aspires to become the first Romany priest in Hungary. Even as a child, he knew he wanted to be a Greek Catholic priest. “It was strange though when I first talked about it,” he recalled.

Eventually, Gyözö’s family took him seriously and sent him to a Greek Catholic secondary school that opened in 1991.

“Now my friends accept it.”

Read more about what it takes “To Be a Priest” in the March 2007 edition of ONE.



13 March 2015
Greg Kandra




A young mother takes her child to church, a sign of a new generation taking root in the Armenian Catholic congregation at Sts. Peter and Paul in Tbilisi, Georgia. To learn more about Armenian Catholics in Georgia, read “A Firm Faith” in the Spring 2014 edition of ONE.
(photo: Molly Corso)




12 March 2015
Greg Kandra




Tamás Fekete stands in his paprika field in Homokmégy, Hungary. (photo: Jacqueline Ruyak)

A few years back, we took readers on a culinary tour of Hungary and discovered a flavorful part of the country’s national character paprika:

Paprika is synonymous with Hungarian cuisine, yet it is a comparative latecomer to the country’s long, richly flavored food culture. Columbus gets the credit for first bringing Capsicum, and other members of the Solanaceae, to Europe from the New World. Called Indian pepper, it was regarded as an ornamental plant with possible medicinal uses. In the 16th century, it was used as a seasoning, mixed with other spices, on the Iberian Peninsula. Elsewhere it was a prized garden ornamental and naturalized, as such, both across Europe and the Turkish empire. In Hungary, it appeared in aristocratic gardens around 1570 as a rare exotic called red Turkish pepper.

The first recorded use of paprika, a Bulgarian diminutive of the Latin piper (pepper), was in a 1775 garden book by Josef Csapo who wrote that peasants ground paprika pods into powder and flavored their food with it — so did fishermen and shepherds. In the late 18th century, Ubaldus, a Capuchin from Austria, wrote of the Kalocsa area: “The spice in their food is a red beast called paprika that burns like the devil.” In the 1820’s, recipes using paprika first appeared in Hungarian cookbooks. By the mid-1800’s, the peasant spice, with its characteristic color, aroma and flavor, had taken over Hungarian cuisine and, eventually, the cuisine of Central and Eastern Europe.

In Homokmegy, a village about six miles from Kalocsa, it was almost harvest time for Tamás and Katalin Fekete, Tony’s parents. Retired farmers, they still plant about three-fifths of an acre of paprika each year. Row after row of the low bushy paprika plants was covered with fiery red conical fruit. Compounds called capsantin and capsorubin give Capsicum varieties their red color when ripe; another, called capsaicin, gives them their characteristic hot taste. Paprika is either sweet (mild) or hot. Tony’s parents grow the sweet paprika for which Kalocsa is famous.

Read more and discover some recipes in Red Gold & Spicy from the September 2005 edition of ONE.



11 March 2015
Greg Kandra




Catechumens greet CNEWA’s president Msgr. John Kozar on his recent pastoral visit to India. To learn more about his trip, and see more photos, read Reaching the Unreached in India in the Winter 2014 edition of ONE. (photo: John E. Kozar)



Tags: India Indian Christians Indian Catholics

10 March 2015
Greg Kandra




An Assyrian woman prays at a church in Damascus on 1 March during a special liturgy for Assyrian Christians abducted by Islamic State fighters. (photo: CNS/Omar Sanadiki, Reuters)

Christian leaders again called for help for Assyrian Christians as Islamic State militants stepped up their attacks against their towns in northern Syria. Catholic News Service reports:

Syria’s northeast Hassake province is emerging as the new battlefield in the fight against the extremist group. Analysts say Hassake province, which extends like a thumb into neighboring Iraq and Turkey, could become the fault line of a new multi-front and lengthy war between Islamic State militants and Christians allied with Kurdish fighters.

“This is a very dangerous situation,” said Bassam Ishak, president of the Syriac National Council of Syria, warning of the major new offensive

on Christian villages along the Khabur River. “The villages on the south side of the river are in the hands of Islamic State militants,” Ishak told CNS. “They took Tal Nasri, which is very close to Tal Tamar,” Ishak explained. Tal Tamar “is at the crossroads of many highways to Aleppo, Syria’s second biggest city; to Qamishli, to Hassake and Ras al Ain.”

The March attacks follow a raid by Islamic State militants on a cluster of villages along the Khabur River on 23 February. More than 220 Assyrian Christians residents and other minorities were abducted then. About 20 Assyrian Christians were later released. Meanwhile, the apostolic nuncio to Syria, Archbishop Mario Zenari, told the Rome-based missionary news agency AsiaNews that Islamic State militants released 52 abducted Assyrian Christian families without ransom payment on 5 and 6 March.

“The 52 families who were held for days by the jihadists” are now safe, the archbishop told AsiaNews 9 March. “The militia still holds 16 people. Half of them are Christians; the other half is made up of Kurds.”

No Assyrian or other organizations reported similar information to confirm the news.

A statement issued by the Syriac National Council of Syria, the European Syriac Union, and the Christian Coalition for Syria said Islamic State militants seized “all villages on the south bank of the Khabur and several villages on the north bank.”

Catholic News Service obtained a copy of the statement, which warned that the extremist group will “try to cross the Khabur with large numbers of fighters and heavy weapons — vastly stronger than the lightly armed self-defense forces of both Christians and Kurds in the area.

Read the rest of the report.

Please continue to keep the people of Syria in your prayers. To learn how you can support them in this time of urgent need, please visit this giving page.



Tags: Syria Violence against Christians War

3 March 2015
Greg Kandra




Women in India have benefited from numerous initiatives of the village of San Joe Puram, including efforts to improve literacy, sanitation and water access. To learn more, read A Place of Promise — and Providence in the Winter edition of ONE. (photo: John Mathew)



Tags: India Village life Syro-Malabar Catholic Church Women Women in India

2 March 2015
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis meets Prime Minister Nechirvan Barzani of the Kurdistan Regional Government of Iraq, third from left, during a private audience at the Vatican on 2 March. During his Sunday Angelus, the pope offered special prayers for the people of Syria and Iraq. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)



Tags: Syria Iraq Pope Francis





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