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Current Issue
December, 2018
Volume 44, Number 4
  
23 October 2018
CNEWA Staff




The interior of this church at Mt. Carmel has been renovated, with new lighting and an improved sound system provided by CNEWA. (photo: CNEWA)

Last week, Laura Schau-Tarazi, in our Jerusalem office, sent us this picture with a note:

On 14 October, CNEWA’s regional director in Jerusalem, Joseph Hazboun, attend the celebration at the Church of the Carmelite Sisters of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Haifa, for the consecration of the newly renovated church and altar.

CNEWA generously covered the costs to improve the interior lighting and sound system of the church, which has helped complete the entire renovation project.

The Monastery Notre Dame du Mont Carmel has a beautiful old church that serves as a venue for local ceremonies and celebrations of the feasts of the order. It also serves as a place of solace and reflection for spiritual retreats. Many weddings and baptisms by the local Christian community are also held at the church.

The church required significant rehabilitation work to the interior of the building, as it suffered from significant damage from water and weather over many years. Additionally, the ground floor became uneven . Most recently, the church tiles were repaired, damage from humidity was treated, and the altar was restructured to meet the needs of the cloistered sisters and the local community.

Despite these changes, the sisters still required funds to improve the interior lighting, which was often too dim. It frequently malfunctioned during events and consumed a lot of electricity. (It is important to note that the sisters had already selected for this work, Melloncelli, an Italian firm that visited the Monastery and designed a lighting system for the church, without taking any charges for the design).

The lighting and sound system provided by CNEWA have significantly reduced electricity consumption and improved the quality of worship in the church.

Thank you to our generous donors, who have helped to bring light to the faithful in the Holy Land — literally! Projects such as these help support the prayerful good work of religious sisters, serve to enhance the spiritual experience for so many, while also giving honor to our Lord and his Blessed Mother.



Tags: Holy Land

22 October 2018
Greg Kandra




The Trippadam Psychosocial Rehabilitation Center offers Indian women in need a safe, loving home. Read how CNEWA reaches out to them and so many others in the September 2018 edition of ONE. (photo: John E. Kozar)



Tags: India CNEWA

19 October 2018
J.D. Conor Mauro




Amir Maher, a Coptic Catholic seminarian studying in Cairo, greets Deacon Boutros Yousef Yacoub in his hometown of Al Wasta, outside of Assiut. You can read more about Mr. Maher and his journey into a life of service in the September 2018 edition of ONE. (photo: Roger Anis)



Tags: Egypt Priests Seminarians

18 October 2018
Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service




Metropolitan Hilarion of Volokolamsk, head of external relations for the Russian Orthodox Church, and Cardinal Kurt Koch, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, leave a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican 18 October. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)

Firm in their faith in Jesus and working together, Orthodox and Catholic young people can resist forces trying to remove all traces of faith from society and even could reverse that trend, Russian Orthodox Metropolitan Hilarion of Volokolamsk told the Synod of Bishops.

Speaking to the synod on 18 October as one of the “fraternal delegates” or ecumenical observers at the gathering, Metropolitan Hilarion said that, since the fall of communism, young people have been returning to the Orthodox Church in Russia.

And, he said, “the upbringing of youth in the Christian spirit is a project that we, the Orthodox, are willing to implement together with the Catholics.”

Since 2015, the Moscow Patriarchate and the Vatican have cooperated to promote exchange programs for their seminarians and young clergy. The Orthodox visit the Vatican and the Catholics spend time in Russia, which “helps us to overcome misconceptions, enriches us spiritually and lays the foundation for cooperation between our churches.”

At a time when young people are bombarded by conflicting information about what they should want and what they should strive for, Christian leaders must help young people learn the art of discernment, he said.

“The contemporary mission of the church,” Metropolitan Hilarion said, is “to teach the younger generation to distinguish good from evil, truth from falsehood, the genuine and truly valuable from that which is instant, transient and superficial.”

Young people need the moral values the church teaches, and they need prayer, liturgy and the sacraments, he said. But “the most important and necessary thing that we can offer all generations is Christ crucified and risen.”

“A cultural, psychological and spiritual abyss separates the contemporary young people from Christ, from his spiritual and moral teaching,” Metropolitan Hilarion said. “Our task is to help young people to overcome this abyss, to feel that they need Christ and that he can transform their life and fill it with content, meaning and inspiration.”



Tags: Ecumenism Russian Orthodox

17 October 2018
Greg Kandra




Palestinian Christians and members of the scouts gather outside the Melkite Greek Catholic Church in Bethlehem. Learn more about how they are Defining ’Christian’ in Palestine in the September 2018 edition of ONE. (photo: Samar Hazboun)



Tags: Palestine

16 October 2018
Greg Kandra




Children gather for a meal at the Mariam Tsion School in Saesa, Ethiopia. Discover how CNEWA carries out its mission of Remembering the Forgotten in the September 2018 edition of ONE magazine. (photo: John E. Kozar)



Tags: Ethiopia

15 October 2018
Greg Kandra




Chamsa Hadaya stands surrounded by family members. (photo: Armineh Johannes)

The new edition of ONE magazine features A Letter from Iraq, in which Chamsa Marzina Hadaya describes her family’s efforts to start over after fleeing ISIS and then returning home:

Right after we fled Qaraqosh, we used some of our savings and spent a few days in a cheap motel. We then rented a small apartment for a few months, but we ran out of funds as our stay lengthened from weeks to months to years. We had to quit the apartment and find another place provided by the church that was a prefabricated room in the camp of Ain Kawa — near the city of Erbil in Iraqi Kurdistan. We stayed there for more than 15 months.

Life was unbearable during our stay in the camp. We had no income and we were completely dependent on charity for every single need. We experienced real destitution and we felt weak, humiliated and alone — strangers in a strange land. Nothing but our faith gave us real support: We felt God’s presence in our daily life, and this gave us hope and determination to hang on for a better life.

I cried. I prayed to God and asked him for his help to preserve our dignity — and God heard me! One of the organizations working in the same camp where I lived offered me a job in the kindergarten, and with this income I was able to help support my husband and family.

I have to admit that, spiritually, I have passed through some difficult times. I questioned God many times, wondering, “How is it possible that he has abandoned us?” But after all those moments of fear, I have finally surrendered my life and my fate to God.

My mother taught me how to live my faith, how to face crises and adapt to change. She taught me how to synchronize my hands and my mind to achieve my goals. Thanks to the image of my mother and her encouraging whispers that have accompanied and guided me in such difficult times, my hope in God has become so strong that now I live it in every single detail of my life. And now, again, I take this opportunity and this experience to pass it on to my children.

Read more in the September 2018 edition of ONE.



Tags: Iraq ISIS

12 October 2018
Greg Kandra




Syrian refugee children greet visitors in the refugee camp of Zahleh, Lebanon, in January 2016. (photo: John E. Kozar)

In the new edition of ONE magazine, arriving in mailboxes this week, CNEWA’s president Msgr. John E. Kozar offers some insight into our association’s mission:

When we communicate with our donors to express our thanks for their generous prayers and financial gifts, we often refer to the gratitude that ultimately comes from the “poor,” those who “suffer” and those who are “persecuted.”

These are broad categories and we might not appreciate the range of these beneficiaries of CNEWA’s good works and support. Let me elaborate a bit.

It is normal to focus on the material needs of the poor. We think of hungry and starving children; mothers desperate to feed or shelter their little ones; an elderly person without a place to call home; or victims of war, floods or other calamities forced to flee, always uncertain what tomorrow might bring.

We especially think of children who have been orphaned, those whose cries and hollow stares penetrate our hearts. We think of children who hunger for education and would give anything to be able to have a formal schooling environment. We think of the elderly, often those most easily forgotten or marginalized. Societies sometimes consider them expendable.

We think of those with special needs who find little or no acceptance in many cultures — those with physical and mental disabilities or social outcasts because of class structures. We think of those victims of religious bigotry or ethnic classification, or those “in the middle” and not accepted by either side. Social and economic exclusion is a reality for so many in our world.

We think of those who are really persecuted, even unto death. They are violated and taken away; they are sometimes killed, but always considered “second class.”

What I am describing is a canvas of the broken, fractured world in which CNEWA is privileged to serve. And in our humble way, with your most generous support and prayerful accompaniment, we do our best to serve those who are poor, those who suffer and those who are persecuted.

I am blessed with vivid memories from my many pastoral visits to those we serve. I’ve seen hungry children being fed and cared for at the hands of religious sisters and church-related programs in areas of conflict and oppression. I have seen the faces of desperate mothers who seek comfort for their ailing children — and find a loving and gentle hand extended by the church.

Check out more in our magazine. And watch the video below, in which Msgr. Kozar shares more of the ways in which CNEWA helps spread the joy of the Gospel to so many who are on the margins.



Tags: CNEWA Msgr. John E. Kozar

11 October 2018
Greg Kandra




Schoolgirls in Chandigarh, India, wear pink turbans on 11 October to mark International Day of the Girl Child. (photo: CNS/Ajay Verma, Reuters)



Tags: India

10 October 2018
Greg Kandra




Youth gather by the headquarters of Bethlehem's Terra Sancta Scouts. Learn more about Defining ’Christian’ in Palestine in the current edition of ONE, now available online. (photo: Samar Hazboun)



Tags: Palestine





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