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Current Issue
March, 2018
Volume 44, Number 1
  
7 March 2018
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2014, two children greet a visitor to Gaza in the ruins of their neighborhood. Read more about Growing Up in Gaza in the Autumn 2014 edition of ONE. (photo: Shareef Sarhan)



6 March 2018
Greg Kandra




Iconographer Ian Knowles works on an icon in his studio in Bethlehem. To learn more about efforts to preserve this ancient form of artistic prayer, read Prayers in Paint in the Summer 2013
edition of ONE. (photo: Nicholas Seeley)




5 March 2018
Greg Kandra




Father Mikhael Khachkalian, the only Armenian Catholic priest in Tbilisi, Georgia prepares for the liturgy in the tiny chapel of the Armenian Catholic Center in Tbilisi. To learn more about A Firm Faith in Georgia, check out the Spring 2014 edition of ONE. (photo: Molly Corso)



2 March 2018
Greg Kandra




Students take a break from their studies at a school run by the Daughters of Charity in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. To learn more about the opportunities they are receiving, read A Letter from Ethiopia in the Spring 2015 edition of ONE. (photo: Petterik Wiggers)



1 March 2018
Greg Kandra




Students at the Father Roberts Institute in Lebanon join hands to perform the dabke, a folk dance native to the Levant. Learn how the church is serving Lebanon’s most vulnerable and Reaching the Margins in the September 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: Don Duncan)



28 February 2018
Greg Kandra




A woman kisses the Stone of Unction, or Stone of Anointing, representing where the body of Jesus was prepared for burial after the crucifixion in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem's Old City on 28 February. The sacred site reopened Wednesday after being closed for three days over a dispute about taxes. (photo: CNS/Ammar Awad, Reuters)



27 February 2018
Greg Kandra




Eritreans walk through Asmara, Eritrea, marking the Feast of Kidane Mehret on 25 February.
(photo: CNEWA)


Last weekend, hundreds of Eritrean Christians turned out to mark an important feast on the Ethiopian and Eritrean calendar.

Some background:

The Ethiopian and Eritrean Orthodox and Catholic churches have a tradition that after Jesus’s Ascension, his mother went to Calvary to pray to him for a favor. Jesus descended in a host of angels to ask what she wanted. Mary asked him to save anyone who would pray or do works of charity in her name. Jesus’s promise to do so is known as Kidane Mehret, the Covenant of Mercy, remembered on Yekatit 16 in the Ethiopian calendar. This usually corresponds to 23 February in the Western calendar; some churches celebrate the feast of Kidane Mehret on the nearest Sunday.

Friends and supporters of CNEWA may also recognize the phrase “Kidane Mehret” from the children’s home that bears that name in Addis Ababa — another reminder of God’s mercy at work in the world.



26 February 2018
Greg Kandra




A rare snowfall covers St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican on 26 February. (photo: CNS/Paul Haring)



23 February 2018
Dale Gavlak, Catholic News Service




Worshipers pray at St. George Chaldean Catholic church in Tel Eskof, Iraq, which was damaged by ISIS militants. Iraqi Catholic leaders are urging Christians to remain steadfast in this Lenten season as they encounter challenges of ISIS’ legacy in their historic lands.
(photo: CNS/Marko Djurica, Reuters)


Iraqi Catholic leaders are urging Christians to remain steadfast in this Lenten season as they encounter challenges of the ISIS’ legacy in their historic lands.

In a Lenten pastoral letter, Chaldean Catholic Patriarch Louis Sako of Baghdad urged Iraqi Christians to pursue unity with other Christians at this sacred time with “open hearts.”

“Many Christians today live in a crisis of faith and intellect because of the circumstances of war, instability, migration and the dominance of social media on the details of their daily lives,” he wrote in the letter, released on 21 February.

Many Chaldean Catholics lost their homes, properties and other possessions as they fled ISIS militants in the summer of 2014. Many are destitute, still living in camps for the internally displaced or sheltering abroad.

“However, these challenges should not discourage their determination and dissuade them from renewing their faith and deepening it, to witness of the Lord and his church,” the patriarch said, calling on Christians to “increase within themselves strength, confidence and enthusiasm.”

Patriarch Sako also repeated his appeal to fellow Iraqis from different religious backgrounds to recognize Christians as “part of the national fabric of Iraq and to stop their decline, for Christians have had a historical presence in this country, where they have a role and a message.”

Chaldean Catholic Archbishop Yousif Mirkis of Kirkuk and Sulaimaniyah estimates that between “40-45 percent of the Christians have returned to the some of their ancestral villages, particularly Qaraqosh.”

But he and other Catholic leaders told Catholic News Service there are many challenges to those Christians hoping to return home after the ISIS occupation and expulsion.

“There are problems with Bartella. Although Bartella is not far from Qaraqosh, the Shiites have been imposing themselves and using the force of Iran to take over territory, etc. The Christians of Bartella are very upset by this situation,” Archbishop Mirkis told CNS by phone.

“Maybe the Americans and Baghdad government are not very aware of what is happening in these villages,” he said.

“The Christians of Bartella tell me: ‘We cannot go back. We don’t dare to go back.’ So, these people are still sheltering in Irbil or in the camps for internally displaced people in Kirkuk and Sulaimaniyah,” Archbishop Mirkis said of the northern Iraqi cities providing Christians with refuge.

“Qaraqosh is a little bit better. There, houses are being repaired. Now, the people are returning, but many houses are burned and are completely destroyed. These Christians cannot afford the prices to reconstruct the houses,” he said.

The archbishop and his dioceses have been helping displaced Christians with material and spiritual support as well as providing transportation for hundreds of their university students. Many Christian supporters claim Christian organizations have been the sole sponsors of reconstruction efforts, without help from the government.

But Father Emanuel Youkhana told CNS that so far, the planned “return, reconstruction and rebuilding movement did not meet our expectations and hopes. Thousands of families are hesitating and/or unable to return, and they are still displaced in Kurdistan.”

The archimandrite, a member of the Assyrian Church of the East, heads the Christian Aid Program Northern Iraq, CAPNI. He spoke to CNS by phone and email.



22 February 2018
Greg Kandra




Youngsters at Our Lady’s Catholic School in Dubbo, Ethiopia, show the youthful promise of Catholic education in a country where Catholics are a small minority. Read more about how Catholic schools are helping students like these go to the Head of the Class in the June 2017 edition of ONE.
(photo: Petterik Wiggers)








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