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Current Issue
September, 2018
Volume 44, Number 3
  
19 July 2017
Greg Kandra




Caritas Georgia Director Anahit Mkhoyan visited CNEWA’s New York office today, 19 July 2017, and led a discussion on the region she serves. (photo: Greg Kandra)

We were delighted to get a visit Wednesday from a longtime friend in Georgia, Anahit Mkhoyan.

Her name may ring a bell. She is director of Caritas Georgia, and wrote A Letter From Georgia in the Winter 2016 edition of ONE — a deeply personal and moving essay that was honored last month at the Catholic Press Awards in Quebec. We were pleased to present Anahit with her award certificate and hear her thoughts about the important work she is doing in Georgia.

“We touch the human,” she told our staff. “This is the precious part of Caritas.”

She spoke, in particular, of her gratitude for CNEWA’s support of the organization’s mother and child center — and the boundless generosity of CNEWA’s donors. The impact of CNEWA’s donors, she explained, is dramatic.

“Financial support becomes spiritual support for us,” she explained. “We can take a case and give the first support, human support, which people really need. We know if we don’t catch a woman and her child now, the kids may end up as street children, she may become a prostitute. It is a vicious cycle. People, when they are left out of one circle, then they drop out of other circles, and Caritas is the only place for them to be safe.”

And she emphasized: “I want you to feel like every spirit, every smile, every saved soul is behind every penny you are raising.”

Thank you, Anahit, for that message — and for being such a generous collaborator in CNEWA’s work!



Tags: Georgia Caritas Caucasus

18 July 2017
Anto Akkara, Catholic News Service




In this image from 2016, stray cows sit in the middle of the road in Bangalore, India. This past Sunday, the Catholic church in India criticized growing intolerance and mob violence targeting religious minorities over cow protection. (photo: CNS/Jagadeesh Nv, EPA)

The Catholic church in India criticized growing intolerance and mob violence targeting religious minorities over cow protection.

“The vast majority of the people of India of all communities (have) been shocked at the lynching in various states on the pretext of protecting cows,” said a statement issued by the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of India after a 16 July meeting in New Delhi. About 40 religious leaders — Christians along with Baha’i, Hindu, Muslim and Sikh — attended the meeting.

The statement asked the government “to end (the) impunity ... at the root of the atmosphere of fear that stalks the land today.”

Some Hindus worship the cow as a goddess and oppose slaughter of cows, with some states even running care centers for cows.

The bishops’ statement said lynchings over cows threatened “the constitution and the democratic fabric of the country.”

In a June report, The Times of India said that since 2014, when the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party came to power, vigilantes had killed at least 32 Muslims. It said that in most of these attacks, the premise had been allegations of cow slaughter, smuggling, eating or even possessing beef.

Mobs have killed meat and cattle traders in the name of protecting the sacred cow.

“We are going through difficult times. What we see on the TV (lynching) is frightening,” Auxiliary Bishop Theodore Mascarenhas of Ranchi, secretary-general of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of India, told Catholic News Service 18 July.

“Hatred is being spread, and attempts are being made to divide the people. We want to create harmony by bringing people of all faiths together,” he said.

The statement urged religious leaders “to assert the inherent unity of the people (to) restore public confidence and remove the mutual growing suspicion.”

At the end of the assembly of the Kerala Catholic Bishops’ Council 8 June, Archbishop Maria Soosa Pakiam of Trivandrum criticized the federal government’s move to curb cattle trade in states like Kerala, where beef eating has no cultural inhibition, even among majority Hindus.

“We will never accept a dictum on what we should eat or do,” Archbishop Soosa Pakiam said.



17 July 2017
J.D. Conor Mauro




Fadia Shamieh, from the Palestinian Christian town of Beit Jala, helps youngsters prepare for their meal at the St. Rachel Day Care Center. This church institution provides care, play and education to the children of migrant workers. For more, read Found in Translation in the June 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: Ilene Perlman)



Tags: Israel Jerusalem Catholic Migrants

14 July 2017
Greg Kandra




David Safaryan displays one of his paintings from art class. (photo: Nazik Armenakyan)

In the June 2017 edition of ONE, Gayane Abrahamyan writes about the exceptional work being done by Caritas in Armenia, with CNEWA’s support, to bring light to the darkness, and help those most in need — especially the elderly and the young:

In one of the large, bright rooms, children stand behind easels, refining pencil sketches and proudly presenting their masterpieces.

The teacher, Vanush Safaryan, is a member of the Painters’ Union of Armenia and a former director of an art school in Artashat. He teaches children not only the craft of drawing and painting, but also the history and appreciation of art more generally.

“Art will save the country,” he says of a country that savors its rich art and architectural heritage. “Let them love the art. Twenty of the children have already chosen this path, so it is already a victory,” he adds.

“We have very bright children; they need to be given freedom and they will reveal themselves.”

The center’s smallest pupil is a 9-year-old named David. David has drawn a picture of construction site, with a worker seated inside a crane and a still-unfinished building nearby.

David lives with his parents and a younger sister in a rented apartment in poor condition. The center offers him an escape, and a sense of hope.

“After school we come here,” he says. “We have dinner, then we play games, draw, do our homework. It is very good.” He stops talking so he can focus on bringing his sketched construction site to life.

Read more in ‘This Is the Only Light’ in the June 2017 edition of ONE.



Tags: Children Armenia Caritas

13 July 2017
Greg Kandra




Dr. Deepa Sasidharan parks his motorcycle outside the offices of Calicut Medical College. Learn how growing up in a Catholic-run institution shaped his life in The Secret of Their Success in the current edition of ONE. (photo: Don Duncan)



12 July 2017
Greg Kandra




Children pray together before their meal at the Little Prince Center in Artashat, Armenia. Learn more about this remarkable center and the work it is doing among the neediest people in the country in ‘This Is the Only Light’ from the June 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: Nazik Armenakyan)



11 July 2017
Greg Kandra




Abba Berhanu Woemago chats with a student outside the Abba Pascal Catholic Girls’ School in Soddo, Ethiopia. Learn why Ethiopian Catholic schools are at the Head of the Class in the
June 2017 edition of ONE. (photo: Petterik Wiggers)




10 July 2017
Greg Kandra




Shilpa Joy provides physical therapy to youth at the Home of Peace. (photo: Don Duncan)

The current edition of ONE features an inspiring glimpse into the lives of young Indian men and women who experienced the profound positive impact of Catholic institutions. One of them is Shilpa Joy:

Shilpa Joy’s job as a therapist requires her to deal with many people every day, something she would never have imagined when she arrived at the sisters’ doorstep, a child escaping a violent home plagued by alcoholism.

“At the children’s home, I learned to adapt, live and work with many different kinds of personalities. I came to understand other people and see how the many other children are. Living with these different types of people helped me to get out of my childhood introversion,” she says.

Recently, Ms. Joy started a new job at the Home of Peace — a center dedicated to children with disabilities, run by the Daughters of Our Lady of Mercy — a stone’s throw away from her home with the Sisters of the Sacred Heart. Indeed, the sisters have welcomed her to live with them once more, temporarily, as she searches for an apartment.

At work in the Home of Peace, Ms. Joy makes use of all her professional skills, providing physical and speech therapy. She also has to adapt constantly to the very specific and sometimes acute needs of the children at the home.

In the home’s physical therapy room, a sort of gym adapted to special needs, one boy works on his balance by sitting on a large ball. Another boy, who wears a prosthetic lower leg, practices walking on the treadmill. At a nearby table, Ms. Joy performs stretches and exercises with another boy who suffers from cerebral palsy.

“Now, I can cope with all kinds of personalities or with difficult people or situations. I have learned, at the children’s home, how to cope with such things.”

After work, she goes back to her accommodations with the sisters. There, she serves as a sort of role model and counselor to the children in the home. She helps the girls with their homework and she urges them to strive for great things.

“I try to share my own experience with them,” the young woman says. “It is a way of trying to motivate them to go further, to study further and to have a happy, fulfilled life.”

Read more about The Secret of Their Success in the June 2017 edition of ONE.



7 July 2017
Greg Kandra




Some Christian families, such as the one shown above, have moved back to their home village of Tel Eskof, Iraq. (photo: John E. Kozar/CNEWA)

In the current edition of ONE, CNEWA president Msgr. John E. Kozar reflects on the uncertain future facing Iraqi Christians:

More than 130,000 Christians in the Nineveh Plain of Iraq fled to what amounted to a “foreign” land in neighboring Iraqi Kurdistan. They became refugees in settlement camps. What has happened to those who settled in these camps and what does the future hold for the displaced?

Having visited Kurdistan recently, I have seen firsthand some of the liberated towns and cities previously held by ISIS. I can personally attest to the devastation of some towns and villages, the desecration of holy places and objects, the total theft of or destruction of all personal property. But the basic structures remain. However, I want to share with you an ongoing dilemma confronting Christians and other displaced people. It is the emotion-filled question: Should I return to my “liberated” town, village or city?

Read more and see more images here.



6 July 2017
Greg Kandra




Father Elias Ibrahim serves Syrian families at the Table of St. John the Merciful in Lebanon.
(photo: Raed Rafei)


The current edition of ONE offers this glimpse at life among Syrian refugees struggling to make a new life in Lebanon:

Even though many Syrian families say they feel generally welcome in Zahleh, local communities routinely express their exasperation with refugees. The stagnant economic situation, the protracted refugee crisis and grudges stemming from the Lebanese civil war — during which Syrian troops laid siege to Zahleh for three months — exacerbate tensions between the two communities.

“We encourage reconciliation initiatives to ease the tension between the Lebanese and the Syrians,” says Michel Constantin, regional director for CNEWA, which provides assistance to refugees and those in need from the host communities through the local churches.

One of these initiatives is a soup kitchen called the Table of St. John the Merciful, named after the seventh-century patriarch of Alexandria famed for never turning away a supplicant. Founded by the church a year ago, this program offers hot meals from Monday to Friday to nearly 350 refugees, as well as poor Lebanese citizens. People from around the city volunteer to staff the kitchen, which receives food from a large number of restaurants, bakeries and more prosperous local families.

On a recent Sunday, the Table received Syrian refugee families after the Divine Liturgy, offering chicken, meat, rice and salad as well as pizza for the children. Those at the gathering enjoyed music, dancing and even, for those of age, a bit of their favorite beverage. Such small comforts mean much to people in need, whether exiled from home or not — bringing a measure of cheer and a much-needed reprieve from their many worries.

“The aim is not only to serve food but to create lasting bonds and harmony among the people here,” said the Rev. Elias Ibrahim, a priest of the cathedral parish. Father Ibrahim oversees the operations of the center and serves also as a spiritual counselor for refugees.

Read more in the current edition of the magazine — and check out the exclusive video on refugees in Lebanon below.








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