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September, 2018
Volume 44, Number 3
  
25 May 2012
Erin Edwards




In this photo taken in 2003, a woman eats at a soup kitchen run by Caritas Georgia, a social service agency of the Catholic Church in Tbilisi, Georgia. (photo: Dima Chikvaidze)

CNEWA serves the elderly in all of its regions, including Georgia:

“About a year ago, a young man came up to me,” Ms. Rodnova explained.

“He asked me if I lived alone or had any family.” As a lone pensioner, he told her, she was eligible for membership in a soup kitchen run by Caritas Georgia, a social service agency of the Catholic Church receiving support from CNEWA.

Since then, Ms. Rodnova’s entire pension has been spent on a daily subway ride that takes her across town to the large building that houses one of Caritas Georgia’s soup kitchens. The ride is worth it, she said.

“I am not hungry anymore. It’s a long ride across town, but without it I don’t know how I would survive,” she added.

To learn more about our efforts in conjunction with Caritas Georgia, read Human Touch Offers Pensioners Respite from the July 2003 issue of ONE.



Tags: CNEWA Georgia Caring for the Elderly Caritas

24 May 2012
Erin Edwards




A woman casts her vote at a polling station in Cairo on 23 May.
(photo: CNS/Ammar Awad, Reuters)


Today, Egyptians went to the polls for the second day in a row to vote for their first-ever, freely elected president. This comes on the heels of the extreme turmoil of the ‘Arab Spring,’ which has reverberated throughout the Middle East.

Today, The New York Times spoke with voters on this second day of historic elections:

Among the many aspects of the race still shrouded in suspense are the future powers and responsibilities of the next president. A political deadlock prevented the drafting of a new constitution, paving the way for a power struggle between the new president, the elected Parliament and the self-appointed military council. The military council has said it will unilaterally issue an interim constitution before leaving power, but it has not yet done so. It was unclear how elected leaders might respond.

For now, most Egyptians were thinking of simple hopes. “I just want a president,” said Ines Mohamed, 40, a housewife waiting to vote. “I want this to end well, to stop all the chaos, to end the bleeding of corruption.”

For some perspective on the situation in Egypt, read “Arab Spring or Arab Awakening?,” a blog post written by our Education and Interreligious Affairs Officer, Rev. Elias Mallon, back in February. Last month, our office in Canada launched a campaign to help support Egypt’s Christians during this rocky time. To learn more, visit our website.



Tags: Egypt Africa Arab Spring/Awakening

23 May 2012
Erin Edwards




In this undated photo from our archive, a group of children play in India.
(photo: Sister Christian Molidor, R.S.M.)


Through the local churches, CNEWA has played a major role in serving the needy in India for many years. To learn about the people and places we serve there, check out Msgr. Kozar’s blog series from his pastoral visit to India earlier this year. It made a powerful impression him.

As Msgr. Kozar put it:

We are privileged and have the honor of reaching out to the needs of so many in India. As much as we might do in helping them, we receive infinitely more as we experience their courage, their kindness, their patience, and especially their FAITH. Yes, above all they are filled with faith. Their trust in God watching over them, with a little help from our CNEWA family, is the great equalizer. It not only keeps them going, but it also brings joy and happiness to their lives…

… I would like to acknowledge our regional director, M.L. Thomas, for his exceptional work in coordinating all our CNEWA efforts in India. He, along with his very devoted staff, serves as the conduit for our charity. It is a huge operation: 349 institutions helped, 22,000 children under sponsorship, thousands of seminarians as adopted spiritual sons, 700 women novices being sponsored and countless projects and programs.

To learn how you can help support the work of CNEWA in India, visit our website.



Tags: India Children

22 May 2012
Erin Edwards




In this photo taken in 2008, students attend class at the school of St. Charles Orphanage in Beirut, Lebanon. (photo: Sarah Hunter )

In this month’s CNEWA Connections, Gabriel Delmonaco writes about an event he attended in Maryland that helped raise funds for Education and Opportunities for Lebanon (EOL). Through a partnership with CNEWA, EOL — “an all-volunteer board of dedicated individuals... with an interest in helping the children of Lebanon” — has been a lifeline of support for youngsters in that country. Below is some information about St. Charles Orphanage, which EOL has supported in the past:

The St. Charles Orphanage has been caring for neglected and needy children in Lebanon for over 125 years. Currently home to 75 orphaned children, the St. Charles Orphanage also has 500 primary students, 250 technical students, and 100 kindergarten children from very poor families. The small staff, run by Sister Josephine Haddad, cares for the areas neediest children, regardless of religious background, providing hot meals, education, shelter, healthcare and other community services.

Visit our website for more from this month’s CNEWA Connections.



Tags: Lebanon Children Middle East Catholic education Catholic Schools

21 May 2012
Erin Edwards




Children at the Meganese Catholic School, directed by the Capuchin Fathers, cheerfully greet CNEWA visitors. (photo: John E. Kozar )

If you have been following our blog over the last couple of months, you may have read the series of posts by our president, Msgr. John Kozar, from his pastoral visit to Ethiopia. We’ve been fortunate to share a selection of the beautiful pictures he took, such as the photo above from Meganese Catholic School. These images help capture the vibrancy he experienced during his pastoral visit. In Msgr. Kozar’s very first blog post from Ethiopia he described the scene at Meganese Catholic School:

Our next visit took us to the Meganese Catholic School, directed by the Capuchin Fathers. Talk about a welcome! Some 1,000 children encircled us, chanting happily and raising high their palm branches. Even the bishop was startled at this reception. The children were so warm and welcoming and responded to my every word and gesture.

The very large campus also includes a health clinic, agricultural components and other programs. We were accompanied by members of the parents association and community elders. Their enthusiasm for the school is obvious and they work hand in hand with the Capuchin Fathers on its administration.

For more from Msgr. Kozar’s Ethiopia visit, check out the rest of his blog posts.



Tags: Ethiopia CNEWA Africa Catholic education Catholic Schools

18 May 2012
Erin Edwards




Miriam Ishak, a 25-year-old Coptic woman, says she experiences harassment and discrimination in her hometown of Samalut, Egypt, because she is Christian. (photo: Holly Pickett)

Independent Catholic News recently reported about a Parliament meeting that focused on the plight of Christian women in Pakistan and Egypt:

At a well-attended meeting in Parliament on Tuesday evening, chaired by Lord Alton of Liverpool, Peers and MPs heard first-hand accounts about the plight of the persecuted church in Pakistan and Egypt — and in particular about the plight of Christian women, whom Lord Alton said faced “double persecution — both on account of their beliefs and their gender.”

The charity Aid To The Church In Need presented parliamentarians with copies of their new report: Christians and the Struggle for Religious Freedom, looking at persecution of Christians in 13 countries, with an introduction asserting the importance of religious freedom; and with copies of Christian Women in Pakistan and Egypt: A Briefing. The speakers included Mrs Asiya Nasir, a Christian woman who is a member of Pakistan’s National Assembly. The meeting also heard from a Pakistani Catholic woman and two Archbishops.

To learn more about the plight of Coptic women in Egypt, read Spotlight: Coptic Women from the September 2011 issue of ONE. Photographer Holly Pickett shared with us some of the difficulties faced by these women, such as Miriam Ishak (pictured above):

Miriam Ishak, a 25-year-old Coptic woman, says she experiences harassment and discrimination in her hometown of Samalut, Egypt, because she is Christian. She says she and her fiance will move to Kuwait after they get married. As members of a religious minority, Coptic women in Egypt often face discrimination. Because of the Coptic Church’s strict divorce laws, some Coptic men and women convert to Islam in order to divorce their spouses, a decision that has far-reaching social and legal consequences on the family and sometimes the entire community. In numerous instances, a Coptic woman’s conversion to Islam has sparked sectarian violence.



Tags: Egypt Africa Coptic Orthodox Church Women (rights/issues) Discrimination

16 May 2012
Greg Kandra




From left, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, Msgr. John Kozar and Msgr. Robert Stern spoke to CNEWA staff members yesterday at a luncheon. (photo: Erin Edwards)

Yesterday, CNEWA staff members had a chance to catch up with an old friend: Msgr. Robert Stern, CNEWA’s president emeritus. He joined us for a luncheon for the CNEWA family hosted by CNEWA’s President Msgr. John Kozar — and he was there to greet another familiar face who dropped by, CNEWA’s chair, Cardinal Timothy Dolan.

Msgr. Stern spoke a bit about what he’s been up to since he retired last fall — sorting through his many papers, traveling and getting used to life away from the office — and offered his continued prayers and heartfelt warm wishes to all of his extended CNEWA family.



Tags: CNEWA

15 May 2012
Erin Edwards




Pictures of the Virgin Mary are ubiquitous in the village of Hodasz, Hungary. Above, an image of Mary adorns the wall of a home. (photo:Balazs Gardi/VII Network)

Earlier this month, we wrote about how during the month of May, Catholics around the world are honoring Mary. The Catholic News Service drew attention to how Catholics in Rome pay tribute to the mother of Jesus this month.

In CNEWA’s world, the Virgin Mary is revered in various ways. Images of the Virgin Mary, like the one above, appear in almost every house in Hodasz, a Hungarian village that is home to a large Romany community. To learn more about this community, check out Our Town in the March 2008 issue of ONE.



Tags: Icons Hungary Greek Catholic Church Gypsy

14 May 2012
Erin Edwards




A Muslim mother receives care for her newborn at the Mother of Mercy Clinic in Zerqa, Jordan, which is run by the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena. (photo: John E. Kozar )

Yesterday, many of us in the U.S. celebrated the mothers in our lives for Mother’s Day.

With the help of CNEWA, one place where mothers are getting a lot of support is Jordan. At the Mother of Mercy Clinic in Zerqa, Jordan, mothers receive care both before and after their children are born. The clinic, run by the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena, serves predominantly Muslim patients. It’s here where young women get the help they need in taking the first steps to begin motherhood. CNEWA has supported the clinic for many years. In 2011, the clinic saw an increase of 4,159 new patients.

To learn more about the clinic, check out Mothering Mercies, an article from the May 2009 issue of ONE.



Tags: Children Jordan Health Care CNEWA Pontifical Mission

11 May 2012
Erin Edwards




Mother Teresa speaks to CNEWA staff members during a visit in October 1970. The late Bishop John G. Nolan, who led CNEWA until 1987, can be seen standing behind her.
(photo: CNEWA Archive )


Earlier today, our archivist Annie Grunow, shared some little-known facts about our agency revealed through items in our archive, which she maintains. One of those “little-known facts ” was about our agency’s early ties to the Blessed Mother Teresa, who visited our New York headquarters and met staff members over 40 years ago.



Tags: CNEWA





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