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March, 2018
Volume 44, Number 1
  
21 August 2012
Erin Edwards




A resident of a home for girls hugs a sister from the Verbo Encarnado (Incarnate Word) community, which runs the child care facility near Alexandria, Egypt.
(photo: Mohammed El-Dakhakhny)


In the November 2004 edition of ONE, we featured a story about the work of the Verbo Encarnado sisters in the Dekhela neighborhood of Alexandria, Egypt. The sisters established homes for girls escaping turbulent and unstable homes for the comfort and security offered by the congregation:

The national average daily income is just over $10 a day. About 23 percent of the population lives below the poverty line. Due to overpopulation, a weak economy and high unemployment, the challenges facing Egypt’s youth are daunting.

Sister María Guadalupe, the superior of the community in Egypt, says the situation in Dekhela is especially bad. The town is poor; there are few social services.

“These girls were living with their families in one room,” she says. “No bathroom, no kitchen, just one room. Sometimes there would be a bed and that’s all. So the girls were spending all their time in the street.”

For more, read Building a Brighter Future.



Tags: Egypt Middle East Sisters Africa

20 August 2012
Erin Edwards




A resident of the Divine House in Zahle, Lebanon, takes a break from playtime.
(photo: Gabriel Delmonaco)


CNEWA has been helping children in Lebanon for many years, primarily through our needy child sponsorship program. During his pastoral visit to Lebanon last winter, Msgr. John Kozar met some children who have benefited from CNEWA’s support at the Blessed Sacrament Orphanage:

We were warmly greeted by the present superior, Mother Francoise Doueihy, and a number of the other sisters. As we tried to meet everyone present, the grand entrance into the hall filled with singing, smiling and happy girls between the ages of 5 and 16. They welcomed us with some songs and dances, dressed patriotically in the colors of Lebanon: red, white and green, especially green, representing the famous cedars of Lebanon.

What a loving and lovable group of young ladies. I shared with them that the children of North America sent them their love and their prayers and they offered the same to all of our children back home. We had some real fun taking photos with all of them. Their radiant faces truly expressed the presence of Jesus on their faces and in their hearts. What a wonderful visit.

Interested in sponsoring a child? Visit our website for more information.



Tags: Lebanon Children Education Orphans/Orphanages

17 August 2012
Elias D. Mallon, S.A., Ph.D.




In this image from last month, Palestinian girls in Jerusalem hold torches during a celebration to mark the breaking of the fast during the holy month of Ramadan.
(photo: CNS/Ammar Awad, Reuters)


Last month, as Muslims began to mark Ramadan, we posted some interesting facts on the season from Fr. Mallon, our education and interreligious affairs officer. This weekend, as the season draws to a close, he shares some further thoughts.

Every year Muslims observe the holy month of Ramadan. During this month Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset, engage in works of charity and attempt to spend more time in prayer and in reading the Qur’an. At the end of each day, Muslims observe what is called the iftar or breaking of the fast for that day. The daily iftar is generally a joyful event. At the end of Ramadan, Muslims celebrate ‘eid ul-fitr (Eidul [or sometimes Id] Fitr), the joyful time of the close of the month of fasting.

There are only two major holy days in Islam. The most important is ‘eid ul-’adha, the Feast of Sacrifice, at the closing of the annual pilgrimage and ‘eid ul-fitr, the Feast of the Breaking of the Fast at the end of Ramadan.

Of the two feasts, ‘eid ul-’adha is theologically the more important and is referred to sometimes as the “greater feast” and ‘eid ul-fitr is referred to as the “lesser feast.” However, the situation is much like that of Christians with Easter and Christmas. Easter is the primary feast of the Christian faith. Nonetheless, for the vast majority of Christians it is Christmas that bears most of the traditions and which has an emotional hold on their religious imagination. So too with Muslims: this feast marking Ramadan’s end creates a bigger stir. For Muslims ‘eid ul-fitr is a time for new clothes, family gatherings, exchange of gifts, decorating with lights, etc. While ‘eid ul-fitr may be the “lesser feast,” it is the one which Muslims celebrate with the greatest amount of joy. In many places, the opening of ‘eid ul-fitr is announced with the firing of a canon. Muslims go to the mosque to greet the beginning of the feast with special prayers and then return home to feasting and celebrating which can last for up to three days.



Tags: Jerusalem Interreligious Islam Palestinians Ramadan

16 August 2012
Erin Edwards




A worker cleans a wind-powered generator at the Renewable Energy Center in Mithradham, India’s first solar-powered educational facility. (photo: Peter Lemieux)

In the current issue of ONE, Peter Lemieux writes about the effects of urbanization on the traditional way of life in Kerala. For the multimedia feature accompanying this story, Peter interviewed Rev. Dr. George Peter Pittappillil, C.M.I., director of the Renewable Energy Center in Mithradham, India’s first solar-powered educational facility. To learn more about this innovative facility, check out the video below:



Tags: India Kerala ONE magazine Urbanization Environment

13 August 2012
Greg Kandra




After winning Olympic Gold in London, Ethiopian long distance runner Meseret Defar kisses an image of the Virgin Mary she’d carried with her. (photo: by Matt Dunham/AP via Vatican Radio)

The moment above captured the attention of the world late Friday during the London Olympics. As Vatican Radio put it:

When Ethiopian long distance runner Meseret Defar crossed the finish line for Olympic Gold, the very first thing she did was reach for an image of the Virgin and Child — which she had carried with her for every step of her 5,000 metre race — and pray, full of thanks and filled with joy.

Defar, an Ethiopian Orthodox, kissed the image and made the sign of the cross. It was one of many public signs of faith on display during the Olympics:

From simple crucifixes to prostrations in prayer, athletes from various religious backgrounds have brought their private, personal relationship with God into the global arena, in moving moments of thanks and praise.

“It is a sign perhaps for many of us in society, that little public signs of faith are no harm”, says Bishop Richard Moth, Bishop of the British Armed Forces. “It’s a sign that faith is not just a personal thing, but in a very simple way they are opportunities for us to proclaim the Gospel, to proclaim faith and all those things can only be good!”



Tags: Ethiopia Africa Ethiopian Orthodox Church

10 August 2012
Erin Edwards




A child plays at the Godano Institution, a home for abused girls, women and their children. (photo: John E. Kozar)

As we mentioned yesterday, the July edition of ONE is now available online! You may have noticed something new in the last few issues of the magazine: a photograph and accompanying essay on the last page in a feature that we call Focus. In this feature, the president of CNEWA, Msgr. John E. Kozar, (a gifted and accomplished photographer, by the way!) shares one of his own photographs of CNEWA’s world and offers a reflection on what that picture means to him. In the July edition he writes about the children of Ethiopia:

As the president of CNEWA, I am privileged to visit many distant lands. And one of the special joys in each and every place is to meet the children. Children have a way of sharing with us a window into the soul of their country, their people and their tribe. The window is not cluttered or ornate; it is simple and clear and bright.

On a visit not long ago, I met the beautiful children of Ethiopia. In a way that only children can reflect, they helped me experience the joys, the hopes and the sufferings of the Ethiopian poor. They welcomed me into a world that is not sophisticated or complicated, but one that is pure, simple and sincere.

For more, check out the July edition of the magazine.



Tags: Ethiopia Children Africa Msgr. John E. Kozar ONE magazine

9 August 2012
Erin Edwards




Kerala’s rapid urbanization often leaves behind impoverished Dalit communities, such as this one in the rural south. (photo: Peter Lemieux)

Our July edition of ONE has just been posted online. In the cover story for this edition, Change Comes to ‘God’s Own Country,’ Peter Lemieux reports on how urbanization is threatening the traditional way of life in Kerala:

While the urbanization underway in Kerala may not involve all the classic socioeconomic upheavals, it certainly has meant profound changes in the state’s traditional social fabric. These days, few disagree the once tightly woven rural extended families and parish communities look frayed and threadbare.

“In Kerala, we’ve always had a strong family tradition rooted in our agrarian culture. Family was never disconnected. There was a family oneness,” explains Father Joseph Makothakat, pastor of Little Flower Syro-Malabar Catholic Church in Fort Cochin. “But these days, we’re a professional society. Families don’t find time to be together. They work six days a week. Husband works in one place, wife works in another. They come home late at night and don’t even have time for evening prayer, nor do their children, who are too busy with their private tutors. The lifestyle is much different now.”

Check out the rest of the magazine online!



Tags: India Kerala Dalits Urbanization

8 August 2012
Erin Edwards




In this photo taken in 1992, a woman prays in a garden in Moscow. (photo: Richard Lord)

In the March 2005 issue of ONE, we featured a profile of the Russian Orthodox Church, which has undergone its fair share of turbulence throughout history:

Relations between the Russian Orthodox and Catholic churches are poor. The cause of much of this pain, the rebirth of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, is not just the Russian Orthodox Church’s opposition to Eastern Catholicism, but an even greater reluctance to let go of its patrimony, for Ukraine is rich in human and natural resources. A truly independent Ukraine will abandon Moscow for the West, fear Russian nationalists allied to the Orthodox Church.

While such fears may be justified, the Russian Orthodox Church has no other choice but to adapt – just as it has in the past. Gone are the days of Soviet-sanctioned persecution. But the pre-Bolshevik days, when the church enjoyed a state-sanctioned dominion over the land, are gone as well. Thus, today the Russian Orthodox Church faces a new challenge: finding its way in a religiously heterogeneous, market-driven Russia.

To learn more, read our profile of the Russian Orthodox Church. The Russian Orthodox Church has been in the headlines lately. In yesterday’s “Page One”, we highlighted a story about a Russian blogger facing criminal charges for inciting hatred towards the Russian Orthodox Church.



Tags: Russia Russian Orthodox Church

7 August 2012
Greg Kandra




Major Archbishop Baselios Mar Cleemis greets CNEWA employee Elizabeth Thomas, who is originally from southern India. (photo: Erin Edwards)

“Witnessing is the most important thing in the Christian life.”

That was the prevailing message of Major Archbishop Baselios Mar Cleemis of the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church, as he paid a visit to CNEWA’s central offices in New York this morning. His Beatitude is on a pastoral visit to some of his church’s parishes and communities in the United States and will attend its annual convention held later this month.

Accompanied by the exarch for Syro-Malankara Catholics in North America and Europe, Bishop Thomas Mar Eusebius, His Beatitude shared some of his thoughts about his country, its people and the vibrant faith they have brought to North America. During a wide-ranging conversation in our staff conference room, he spoke passionately and eloquently about “witnessing” to the faith — through acts of compassion, charity and simple piety.

“We do that,” he said, “through education, through health care, through caring for those with H.I.V. and leprosy. It has to do with human dignity. I am proud and happy of how our people give witness with how they live.”

The major archbishop also wanted to underscore the universality of the Catholic Church. “Catholicity,” he noted, “is not uniformity, but diversity.” And he said that the Syro-Malankara Church could make its own unique contribution to “bring a new dimension to the Catholic Church.”

“We promote the theology of communion,” he said. “In this country, we have a strong vocation of being an apostle of communion.”

We are not here, he said, “just to preserve our linguistic tradition, but to strengthen the existing Catholic community. The church is beyond ethnic and linguistic boundaries.

“A lot of people have deserted, have gone away from the church and I think we have a responsibility. ... We have a role to play, to bring people back to the fold,” he continued.

Mar Cleemis was especially excited about reaching out to Hispanic non-Catholics in the United States, and working to draw them back into the faith.

“We want to make our liturgical experience available to them,” he said emphatically, “and I think we must seriously work to promote Catholic communion among them. That is my special dream for our presence in the U.S.”

In drawing a portrait of his immediate predecessor, Cyril Mar Baselios, he described the unassuming archbishop as “a man set apart for all.” In fact, this is a unique charism of the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church, and those who lead it.



Tags: CNEWA Syro-Malankara Catholic Church Indian Catholics

6 August 2012
Erin Edwards




A member of the Daughters of Mary congregation in Pilankalai, Tamil Nadu, poses for a portrait. (photo: John E. Kozar)

During his trip to India earlier this year, Msgr. John Kozar had the pleasure of meeting members of the Daughters of Mary, a congregation of sisters in Tamil Nadu, who care for children in need:

One of the highlights of the day followed when we visited Vimala Orphanage. Here, we were warmly greeted by the house superior, Sister Rose Francis, and the house director, Sister Savio, and a bevy of beautiful young girls. Sisters led us inside where about a 140 girls — all orphans or abandoned and neglected — were assembled to greet us. This contingent of smiling girls represented three different orphanages, all of which are directed by the Daughters of Mary.

The main feature of our visit was to be entertained with songs and dances by these very special children. Their intricate hand and foot motions, their obvious delight in sharing their gifts with us and their genuine happiness overwhelmed me. The simplicity and the sincerity and the faith of these children were an inspiration to all of us.

After the entertainment, I had the privilege to chat with the girls. I shared with them a very simple message: That each one of them is a part of God’s family and that God loves each and every one of them as he loves children everywhere. I further shared with them that they have family in North America, in Canada and the United States, members of the CNEWA family who lovingly support them. Some of them even referred to you as their aunties and uncles to whom they have written. Please know how much they love you and how they promise to remember you in their prayers.

For more from Msgr. Kozar’s pastoral visit to India, read his blog series, “In the Footsteps of St. Thomas.”



Tags: India Sisters Orphans/Orphanages Disabilities





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