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Current Issue
September, 2018
Volume 44, Number 3
  
11 June 2014
Greg Kandra




A child of Ambo, Ethiopia whose isolated village has not been spared by AIDS. To learn of efforts there to battle this disease, read the article Ambo’s Hope in the March 2005 issue of ONE.
(photo: Sean Sprague)




Tags: Ethiopia

10 June 2014
Greg Kandra




Hilda Ajrab watches her brother, Henry, who, like her son, is a drug addict.
(photo: Peter Lemieux)


In 2004, we looked at the personal, often painful war being waged on drug addiction in Palestine:

Hilda Ajrab peers warily out her front door and down the Via Dolorosa in Jerusalem’s Old City. It is from this street — the street down which Christ carried his cross — that narcotics first entered her home and consumed her world.

Mrs. Ajrab steps back into the house, checks her watch and asks her husband, Emil, “Shouldn’t he have called by now?”

The couple are waiting for their regular Friday afternoon call from their son, Johnny, a heroin addict who is spending a year as an inpatient at a rehabilitation center.

It is the only chance they get to speak to him these days.

Johnny is one of the few addicts to have the opportunity to try to get clean in a place far away from the drug playground the Old City has become in recent years.

A study of drug abuse among Palestinians in Jerusalem has found what Mrs. Ajrab and the community at large have long known — drug abuse is rising precipitously.

While hashish has been readily available in Jerusalem’s Arab population centers since before 1980, the far more addictive heroin (here known as “coke”) has become an easily obtained drug of choice in the last 20 years.

Many blame this uptick in drug abuse on a society weakened by years of conflict with Israel.

Read more about Fighting a Modern Plague in the May-June 2004 issue of ONE.



Tags: Palestine Health Care Bethlehem

9 June 2014
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis looks on as Israeli President Shimon Peres, left, and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas embrace during an invocation for peace in the Vatican Gardens on 8 June.
(photo: CNS/Paul Haring)




Tags: Pope Francis Palestine Israel

6 June 2014
J.D. Conor Mauro




A parishioner prays at the shrine to Our Lady of Iraq at the Chaldean church in Amman, Jordan. To learn more about the Iraqi Christian community in Jordan, read Out of Iraq, from the Spring 2013 issue of ONE. (photo: Cory Eldridge)



Tags: Refugees Iraqi Christians Jordan Chaldean Church Chaldeans

5 June 2014
J.D. Conor Mauro




A nun walks home after farming a small plot in Ethiopia’s countryside. To learn about the challenges Ethiopian women face, read An Uphill Battle, from the May 2009 issue of ONE. (photo: Petterik Wiggers)



Tags: Ethiopia Education Women (rights/issues) Women

4 June 2014
Greg Kandra




U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry poses with Bechara Peter, patriarch of the Maronite Church, in Beirut on 4 June. Kerry is on an unannounced trip to Lebanon to bring Obama administration support to the country’s government as it confronts severe difficulties, with an influx of refugees in Syria and a political stalemate at home. (photo: CNS/Mohamed Azakir, Reuters)



3 June 2014
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2002, Bishop Nersess Bozabalian instructs seminarians at Armenia’s Vazkenian Armenian Apostolic Theological Seminary. (photo: Armineh Johannes)

In 2002, we visited Armenia to report on life at the local seminaries:

The future of Armenia’s church percolates in the minds of its young seminarians.

In dark blue uniforms resembling military garb, the young seminarians of Vazkenian Armenian Apostolic Theological Seminary line up to attend Sunday Divine Liturgy at St. Arakelotz Church on the Sevan Lake peninsula in eastern Armenia. The seminary is named after the late Vazken I, Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians. The visionary leader pioneered the Armenian Church’s commitment to ecumenism.

The Vazkenian theological seminary was founded in 1990 on the Sevan peninsula. Once an island, this bit of land was gradually absorbed into the surrounding terrain in the 1940’s with a loss of lake waters. Located 36 miles north of the capital of Yerevan, and with an altitude of 6,600 feet above sea level, the area seemed an ideal spot for a seminary because of its serene atmosphere, its pure air and its proximity to the ancient churches of St. Arakelotz and St. Hovannes on the peninsula.

Sevan Lake, like the famous Mount Ararat — legendary home to the remains of Noah’s ark — is the pride of the Armenian nation. The beauty of this area has inspired poets, musicians and artists alike from around the globe.

Seminarians are admitted to Vazkenian seminary after finishing high school. The maximum age for entrance to the seminary is 23. Beginning in September, the academic year runs until June, with 52 to 55 students enrolled each year. The rigors of the first year, however, often weed out some students.

“At the end of the year there are usually 46 or 47 seminarians left,” says Father Minas Martirossian, the seminary’s rector.

“They leave for health or family reasons,” he adds, while others simply learn that they are unsuited for priestly life.

Seminarians study for five years, after which they take an exam and are then transferred to the Gevorkian Apostolic Theological Seminary in Etchmiatzin for their final years of study. Each year one or two top students in their fourth or fifth year are sent to France, Germany, Switzerland, Romania or the United States for further study.

Read more on Hopeful Growth in Armenia’s Seminaries in the March-April 2002 issue of our magazine.



Tags: Armenia Seminarians

2 June 2014
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople kiss the Stone of Unction in Jerusalem’s Church of the Holy Sepulchre on 25 May. The two leaders marked the 50th anniversary of the meeting in Jerusalem between Pope Paul VI and Patriarch Athenagoras.
(photo: CNS/Grzegorz Galazka)


Msgr. John E. Kozar, CNEWA’s president, offers some personal reflections and insight into the pope’s recent visit to the Holy Land in a column for the latest edition of Pittsburgh Catholic:

Pope Francis came first and foremost as a pilgrim to pray. He also came as a church leader to unite, as a world figure to invite all parties to renounce violence, and to embrace forgiveness, mercy and justice.

His visit was religious in nature and not political, even though every word uttered, every gesture and facial expression, every venue visited has been dissected for a political angle. But this pope doesn’t “second guess” himself, he is not driven by media reviews. He is the “real deal.”

He came to the Holy Land for a number of reasons: to confirm anew the determination of all Christians to be one, as was boldly affirmed 50 years ago by his predecessor, Pope Paul VI, and Ecumenical Patriarch Athenagoras; to demonstrate a solidarity with millions of innocent people displaced by war in Syria and Iraq; to highlight the long suffering of the Palestinian people seeking a permanent homeland; and to encourage Christians to remain in this Holy Land and the greater Middle East.

A prayer service, led by Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, took place in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, the site of Jesus’ death, burial and resurrection. Also participating were leaders of the Latin and Eastern Catholic traditions as well as most of the Orthodox churches, most of whom trace their foundation to apostolic times. The pope and the ecumenical patriarch signed a declaration to continue to pursue “communion in legitimate diversity.”

Pope Francis no doubt surprised the Israelis and Palestinians when he invited both sides to come to his “house” in the Vatican to pray together with him for peace. And the good news is that both sides have accepted his invitation.

Read more.



30 May 2014
Greg Kandra




A painting of the Virgin Mary hangs on the wall of Our Lady of Zion Church in Aksum, Ethiopia.
(photo: Sean Sprague)


As May draws to a close — the month devoted to the Virgin Mary — we get a glimpse at a colorful depiction of Mary from Ethiopia (above) and offer some insight into the place where it originated. From the March 2011 issue of ONE:

Located in Ethiopia’s far northern region of Tigray, Aksum is the former capital of an empire that dominated the Horn of Africa from the third century B.C. to the eighth century after Christ. Home of the fabled queen of Sheba, Aksum is best known as the cradle of Ethiopian Christianity, which became the faith of the empire when the Aksumite emperor, Ezana, embraced it in the early fourth century. Today, Ethiopia’s Christian majority is mostly Orthodox.

Since its earliest days, Aksum has been a center for sophisticated and distinctive decorative arts and crafts, especially metalwork, woodcarving and painting. Scholars believe that soon after Christianity took root in the city, artists began fashioning items utilized in the Qeddase (or Divine Liturgy), mainly ecclesiastical crowns, crosses, fans, icons and manuscripts. Geometric carvings, first utilized in pre-Christian era art of the area, predominated.

Not until the late 16th century, after Portuguese Jesuit missionaries arrived in Ethiopia and dazzled Aksum’s elite with their early Baroque artifacts, did local artists begin adding the finer flourishes that many now associate with traditional Ethiopian liturgical art. Manuscript cases, for example, became more intricate and featured figurative and geometric forms; manuscript pages contained delicate and colorful designs, as well as images of the saints, the Virgin Mary and Christ.

Read more about Ethiopia’s Vibrant Sacred Art from the March 2011 issue of ONE.



Tags: Ethiopia Orthodox

28 May 2014
Greg Kandra




In Lebanon, young refugees at a community center run by the Good Shepherd Sisters smile
for a visitor. (photo: John E. Kozar)


Later this week, CNEWA will be taking part in an important gathering in Rome, focusing in large part on helping refugees like those shown in the picture above.

Vatican Radio has the details:

On Friday, 30 May, the Pontifical Council “Cor Unum” will host a coordination meeting between the Catholic charitable organizations that operate in the context of the Syrian crisis...

...Speakers will include Archbishop Mario Zenari, Apostolic Nuncio to Syria, and Bishop SE Antoine Audo, president of Caritas, Syria. Finally, the activities carried out at the information office in Beirut, set up last year to collect and distribute data on the work of Catholic organizations, will be presented. In the afternoon, the practical aspects of cooperation between the various parties in Syria and neighboring countries will be the focus of attention.

The objective of the meeting, in line with the path taken in the last two years by the Holy See, and as a result of the meeting of 4-5 June 2013, organized by the Pontifical Council, is to make an assessment of the work done so far by the Catholic charitable organizations in the context of the crisis, highlighting critical issues and identifying priorities for the future.

Michel Constantin, regional director for Lebanon, Syria and Egypt, will represent CNEWA.

Wondering how you can help kids like those in the picture? Click this link to find out.







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