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Volume 43, Number 3
  
17 April 2012
Erin Edwards




A children’s choir performs at the Ethiopian Orthodox parish in Temple Hill, a Maryland suburb of Washington, D.C. (photo: Erin Edwards)

In 2009, I had the opportunity to visit with and learn from members of the Ethiopian community in Washington, D.C. Washington is home to the largest group of Ethiopians outside of the country itself — pretty remarkable. You can imagine the amount of culture, history and tradition that flows through the city. From the Ethiopian restaurants to the Orthodox churches, there were many moments in which I felt as though I was in Ethiopia.

Check out my interviews below with some of the young women I met while in D.C. For more, read the accompanying article by Vincent Gragnani, America’s Horn of Africa in the March 2009 issue of ONE.



Tags: Ethiopia Africa Ethiopian Orthodox Church

11 April 2012
Erin Edwards




In this photo taken in 2009, Ethiopian women carry firewood up a hill in the Eparchy of Emdibir. (photo: Gabriel Delmonaco)

Throughout rural Ethiopia, women and girls carry out many of the domestic chores — which are almost always strenuous physically and very time consuming. It is not uncommon to see women, like the two pictured above, walking up hills and side roads with heavy buckets or baskets filled with food, water, or any other common necessity strapped to their bodies. Norma Intriago, a fundraiser in CNEWA’s development office, saw this first hand during a visit to Ethiopia in 2009:

“We saw women and girls working, fetching/collecting water, often walking miles to do so. [Some would] carry firewood (like the women in Gabriel’s photo) for cooking, transporting food & goods to sell at the market and caring for children. It was quite common to see a young toddler carrying her infant sibling on her back. I was stunned with all the responsibility that befalls women and girls in Ethiopia and [other parts of] the underdeveloped world, leaving little time, if any, for an education and healthcare.

CNEWA has worked with Catholic schools throughout Ethiopia for many years. To learn how you can help, visit our website.



Tags: Ethiopia Africa Women Ethiopian Catholic Church

20 March 2012
Erin Edwards




In this image taken in December 2008, a worker prepares grapevines at the La Salle Center near Meki, Ethiopia. (photo: Peter Lemieux)

In 2007, the Brothers of the Christian Schools launched the La Salle Agroprocessing and Farmers’ Training Center facility in Meki, Ethiopia, which produces quality products, such as wine, marmalade, yogurt and butter, for domestic and international markets. The brothers aimed to develop a sustainable, profitable facility that at the same time provided educational, economic and professional opportunities to the community:

Women, wrapped in scarves to protect them from the scorching sun, clear brush from under the vineyard’s 20,000 imported Italian grapevines — grouped together by origin and identified with signs, such as “Barbera,” “Sangiovese” and “Montepulciano.”

If all goes according to plan, the brothers will have completely transformed this ordinary 75-acre plot of subdivided farmland into an integrated, income-generating agribusiness. Since the project’s inception, the brothers have raised a total of $800,000 in grants, which they have used to purchase the land, plants, construction materials, machinery and to pay labor costs. The next installment of funds will be used to double the amount of land, purchase 20,000 more imported grapevines and strawberry plants, and add livestock, including cattle, chickens, fish and pigs.

At every turn, the La Salle Center will provide economic, educational and professional opportunities to the community. Projecting a 54-person payroll, which will swell to 100 during harvest time, the brothers intend to staff the endeavor with people from the local community, who will gain on-the-job skills in modern agricultural techniques for use on their own family farms. The on-site agricultural training center will also offer workshops on improved agricultural techniques, such as biogas production, small- scale drip irrigation, animal husbandry and crop selection. The brothers also plan to loan the center’s tractors and other equipment to local farmers at below market rates.

For more, read Farming a Brighter Future.



Tags: Ethiopia Africa Farming/Agriculture Employment

15 March 2012
Erin Edwards




Teacher Manna Gebreyons, interacts with her students at a Catholic school in the Tigrayan village of Sebia, Ethiopia. (photo: Sean Sprague)

In 2009, we interviewed Sister Winifred Doherty, a member of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd, about empowering women in Ethiopia. She stressed the importance of knowledge as a tool of empowerment. Having access to education provides the opportunity for success and prosperity. Though Catholics are a minority in Ethiopia, Catholic-run schools are making a difference. Take a look at our interview with Sister Winifred Doherty below:



Tags: Ethiopia Education Africa Catholic Schools

6 March 2012
Erin Edwards




Deacon Kassahun Teka, age 27, studies for the priesthood in his one-room, windowless dwelling in Meki, a rural town in southern Ethiopia. He belongs to St. Michael’s Church in Meki.
(photo: Peter Lemieux)


Yesterday, The Wall Street Journal reported on the evolution of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church’s role in encouraging those infected with H.I.V. to take their prescribed drugs while continuing to practice their faith rituals. Similarly, in the September 2009 issue of ONE, Peter Lemieux reported on how Ethiopian Orthodox clergy were adjusting to the many social and economical changes in Ethiopia. Among these changes being the general increase in public awareness of public health issues, including H.I.V./AIDS. These changes fueled adjustments to curriculum used in clergy training centers:

“When you see the potential that the members of the clergy have in such development activities, we have to get them engaged. We need to train them. The need is growing for our clergy to be more aware of what’s going on around the world rather than just limited to the Ethiopian situation.”

The program’s current curriculum already reflects this thinking.

“I’d say the curriculum is 60 percent development, 40 percent spiritual,” Dr. Legesse adds.

Participants learn about a number of issues, including alleviating poverty, gender equality, public health and environmental conservation. They also gain practical training in the latest agricultural techniques for the small-scale cultivation of fruits, vegetables, teff and beans. And they learn of the crucial importance of speaking openly with parishioners about traditionally taboo subjects, such as sexual behavior and H.I.V./ AIDS, as well as how to deal appropriately with individuals infected with the virus.

“In earlier times, a young girl went to a priest and told him she had H.I.V.,” recalls Abba Welde Gabriel of St. Michael’s Church in Meki, 12 miles from Ziway. “She asked for a blessing, and the priest said, ‘You’re too young for H.I.V. Go away.’ Now they’ve been trained to address that situation.”

The curriculum also aims to develop and strengthen the clergy’s interpersonal and communication skills. Traditional priestly formation emphasizes memorization, celebrating the liturgy, administering the sacraments, preaching and chanting. In general, this formation does not provide young clergy with the people skills required to lead a parish community in today’s fast-changing world.

“Some priests are born religious people and receive due respect, but others aren’t and don’t. They lack self-confidence,” says Abune Gregorius of Ziway. “You have to consider their position as role models for society. Priests have to live up to that requirement. The clergy training centers help them do that.”

Deacon Kassahun Teka, who serves St. Michael’s Church in Meki, recently completed the clergy training program. The 27-year-old credits it with having made him a more effective minister.

For more, read As It Was, So Shall It Remain?.



Tags: Ethiopia Africa Ethiopian Orthodox Church HIV/AIDS

3 February 2012
Erin Edwards




Students of the Asela school and orphanage, administered by the Consolata Fathers, a Catholic community of brothers and priests, play soccer on the playground. (photo: Petterik Wiggers)

This Sunday, millions around the world will be watching American football’s biggest game of the season, Super Bowl XLVI. In many parts of CNEWA’s world, soccer is the game of choice. In this unpublished photo from the January 2008 issue of ONE, students of the Asela school and orphanage in Ethiopia practice some tricks.

Asela school and orphanage, run by the Consolata Fathers, has helped to educate many abandoned and some disabled boys since it opened its doors nearly 30 years ago. To learn more about the Asela school and orphanage, read Revealing Hidden Talent by Sisay Abebe.



Tags: Ethiopia Education Africa Orphans/Orphanages Disabilities

26 January 2012
Erin Edwards




Monks process toward Abuna Garima Monastery, near Adwa, Ethiopia, to celebrate the visit of Patriarch Paulos, who was once a monk at the monastery. (photo: Sean Sprague)

In the May 2006 issue of ONE Michael La Civita wrote about how Ethiopia honors Mary, with a celebration that takes place annually on 30 November:

Not far from Ethiopia’s disputed border with Eritrea lies the sleepy town of Aksum (population, 41,000). Though not a common tourist destination, Aksum holds its place as an important heritage site. It is littered with archaeological ruins, including the steles for which it is famous. Once the capital of a prosperous empire that stretched from eastern Africa to Arabia, Aksum controlled the East-West trade routes linking India and Rome. Its emperors were among the first to embrace Christianity, using it to forge a distinct culture and nation from a bewildering number of ethnic and linguistic groups.

Each year, on 30 November, Aksum is aroused from its sleep. Tens of thousands of Ethiopians, wrapped in their white pilgrimage attire, or gabis, converge on Aksum to celebrate one of Ethiopia’s holiest days, Mariam Zion, or Mary of Zion. They focus their attention on a modest shrine that is actually part of a cluster of churches all dedicated to her. Surrounded by a simple iron fence, and guarded by a solitary monk who alone has access to its contents, the chapel houses Ethiopia’s greatest treasure, the Ark of the Covenant.

To learn more about this tradition, read Ethiopia Celebrates Mary.



Tags: Ethiopia Africa Monastery Aksum

28 December 2011
Erin Edwards




Founded by the Good Shepherd Sisters in 1987, the Bethlehem Day Care Center serves the families of Cherkos, an impoverished neighborhood in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
(photo: Sean Sprague)


A Catholic school education opens the door to a new world and better life for many of the families CNEWA serves. Its value is priceless, as Sean Sprague reported in this story from the March 2006 issue of ONE.

Paul Wachter reported on the social implications of providing children with a Catholic school education in Ethiopia in the March 2007 issue of ONE:

While much progress is being made at relatively prosperous schools like Bisrate Gabriel (which CNEWA supported in the past), the greatest challenges lie with Ethiopia’s underserved poor.

“It helps if we reach the kids early,” said Genet Assefa, principal of the Bethlehem Day Care Center. The center, founded by the Good Shepherd Sisters in 1987, caters to the children of Cherkos, a slum in Addis Ababa that takes its name from the neighborhood church. (The sisters run a second day care facility in Addis Ababa, the Good Shepherd Sisters’ Center.)

On a recent visit to the Bethlehem center, more than 150 children, all under 7, were fully engaged in their classes. Some recited the English alphabet: “C! C is for cat.” Others practiced Amharic, their national language.

“The center serves two purposes,” said Mrs. Assefa. “It gives these children access to an early education that they wouldn’t ordinarily have, which will encourage them to go on to primary school and beyond. And it also frees up the parents, many of whom are single mothers, so that they can try to earn a living and improve their lives.”

For more see, Making the Grade in Ethiopia and Breaking Barriers. To learn how you can help educate a child in Ethiopia, visit our website.



Tags: Ethiopia Children Africa Catholic Schools

2 December 2011
Erin Edwards




We explored coffee’s critical role in Ethiopia’s economy, in the November issue of ONE. Equally important is the cultural significance of the coffee ceremony. Sometimes taking hours, the ceremony consists of the manual brewing of coffee and is often accompanied with the burning of incense. It is a socially unifying aspect of Ethiopian culture.

Recently a Queen of Sheba Ethiopian Restaurant employee reenacted a traditional Ethiopian coffee ceremony for us. Watch the video below!

To learn more about the significance of coffee in Ethiopia, check out Brewed to Perfection by Peter Lemieux. For more about Queen of Sheba, watch our interview with owner, Philipos Mengistu.



Tags: Ethiopia Cultural Identity Africa

23 November 2011
Erin Edwards




An Ethiopian monk enjoys a lunch of injera and shiro in Tullo Gudo Island, Ethiopia.
(photo: Sean Sprague)


Tomorrow, many Americans will spend the day enjoying a feast with loved ones. So today, as everyone prepares for the big holiday, we’d like to share some of a feast from CNEWA’s world. It’s the national dish of Ethiopia — injera, which is a spongy, crepe-like bread made from the extremely fine grain known as tef. It is typically eaten with stews and veggies of all sorts. No utensils necessary for this delicacy!

Interested in learning how to prepare injera? Check out this recipe on Food.com!

Happy Thanksgiving from our family to yours!



Tags: Ethiopia Africa Cuisine Monasticism





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