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Current Issue
December, 2017
Volume 43, Number 4
  
17 January 2018
Sister Nigisti Desta




Sister Nigisti Desta. (photo: CNEWA)

Editor’s note: Today we begin a periodic series, “Stories from the Field,” first-person accounts of the impact CNEWA’s work is having around the world. Today we hear from Sister Nigisti Desta, who grew up in a CNEWA-supported orphanage in Ethiopia. Our regional director in Addis Ababa, Argaw Fantu, spoke with her recently and she shared with him this moving account of her life.

I was born in Mekele town, in northern Ethiopia’s Tigray region, in 1984. My mother is Aregash Kahesay. I was the third child born in my family, with four brothers. My father died when I was an infant, so I didn’t know him. Raising five children with no father was the biggest burden for my mother. Thus my mother sent my oldest brother and me to boarding school. My brother went to the boys’ boarding school in Dessie run by the Capuchin Brothers, while I went to the Kobo Orphanage run by Ursuline Sisters.

From grades 1-4, I attended Blessed Gebremichael Catholic School in Mekele. From 1996 to 2002, being at the orphanage with the sisters, I attended grades 5-12 in Kobo. While at the orphanage, I took not only academic classes, but also religious classes from the sisters. These became the cornerstones of my life. I learned how to do household chores and how to live in a community. What the sisters were doing for us — motherly care, showing love, fulfilling our needs — was very touching. I remember all these things. Sometimes, donations would arrive, and the sisters would use the money to buy shoes and clothes for us. They told us that there are supporters behind the scenes, especially CNEWA.

Over time I had a lot of positive observations on the services delivered by the sisters and the generosity of their hearts. I started pondering in my mind, thinking that “if the sisters dedicate their life and time to serve us orphaned and semi-orphaned children like this, why not me!? Why couldn’t I serve others in the future and be one of the sisters?” This thought grew within me. After completing my secondary education, I discerned my vocation and joined the same congregation.

When I asked the sisters to join their congregation, they accepted me immediately. In 2003, they sent me to Addis Ababa to begin my postulancy studies. I did my postulancy for two years and then spent two years in the novitiate. In 2006, I made my first vows and then was sent to Wolisso St. Luke Hospital and Nursing College to pursue my studies in nursing. I did that for three years. Upon graduating from Nursing College, I was assigned to serve in the clinic of Ursuline Sisters in Addis Ababa at a place called Gurd Shola. I served in this clinic for three years, from 2009 to 2012. While serving at the clinic, I got the opportunity to attend Health Officer Courses at Rift Valley College for four years and I earned my degree. Going forward, currently I am doing my second year medical studies at Hayat Medical College in Addis Ababa. It is a six-year course and, God willing, I will graduate in 2022.

Sister Nigisti Desta is shown receiving her degree from Rift Valley College in 2016. (photo: CNEWA)

With God’s will and guidance, together with the support of generous donors like CNEWA and the maternal care and love of the Ursuline sisters, upon completing my medical studies I would like to serve my congregation — and, in particular, the people of Kobo in the neighborhood where I grew up.

I know there are some girls who didn’t get the kinds of opportunities I have now. They need moral support and, if possible, material assistance to make their dreams real.

I am so grateful to CNEWA and its donors. Without their support, my life today as a religious sister working in health care would not have been possible.

For all your good deeds, may the good Lord reward you! I confidently say that I am the product of CNEWA’s support. Thank you so much. May God bless all of you. I keep you in my prayers.