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Current Issue
September, 2018
Volume 44, Number 3
  
17 July 2013
J.D. Conor Mauro




In this photo from Sunday, 7 July 2013, Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I presides over the concelebration of the Divine Liturgy for the patronal feast of the Church of St. Kyriaki in Kontoskali, Istanbul, with Metropolitans Germanos of Theodoroupolis and Athenagoras of Kydonies. Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Myra was also in attendance. (photo: N. Manginas/The Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople)

Ecumenical patriarch sympathizes with protests, prays for kidnapped bishops (AsiaNews) Ramadan has not stopped anti-government protests, which began with the events of Gezi Park. At an iftar (the traditional dinner after the daily fast during Ramadan) offered by the mayor of Istanbul to leaders of non-Muslim religious minorities, Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I showed his interest in and sympathy for the protests, which are a sign of the growing desire for democracy and justice in Turkish society. In a veiled reference to the protests in Gezi Park, the patriarch said, “We are excited and joyful witnesses to important facts that seek to find a solution to long-standing situations that have accumulated over the years in Turkish society even though they cause divisions and polarization.” In his brief but tough speech, Bartholomew mentioned the kidnapping of Greek Orthodox Metropolitan Paul and Syriac Orthodox Metropolitan Yohanna, expressing concern for their fate and inviting all those present at the iftar dinner to pray for them…

Concern for Syrian refugees grows (Vatican Radio) Suspected rebel gunmen assassinated a well-known supporter of Syrian President Bashar al Assad in Lebanon today, the latest sign that Syria’s civil war is spreading to its smaller neighbor. It was the first assassination of a pro-Assad figure in Lebanon since Syria’s conflict started more than two years ago. Meanwhile, the United Nations has appealed for more humanitarian aid for Syrian refugees…

After Morsi, Christians and churches targeted by Islamists (AsiaNews) More than 100 Christian families have fled Al Arish in the Sinai after receiving death threats from Islamist groups following the fall of Muhammad Morsi. Currently, Coptic churches in northern Sinai have canceled all services and meetings, except for the Divine Liturgy on Friday. No Christians are left in the towns of Rafah and Sheikh Zowayd. The Sinai Peninsula has always been a home for Islamist groups, many of them linked to Hamas in Gaza. For decades, they have fought against the Egyptian army as it tried to stop weapon supplies and smuggling into the Gaza Strip. Under Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood, the army had reduced pressure on them but now the military is back in force following the fall of Hosni Mubarak’s successor…

Russian, Serbian patriarchs criticize Serbian government (B92) Serbian Orthodox Patriarch Irinej has conferred with Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill in the Russian Patriarchate in Moscow. The Serbian church head sought the aid of the Russian Orthodox Church and the Russian government in the preservation of Kosovo and Metohija, leveling criticism at the Serbian authorities. Patriarch Irinej underlined that Serbia must not renounce Kosovo and Metohija, because that would imply renouncing its history, culture, spirituality and holy sites. Patriarch Kirill remarked that the Russian Orthodox Church agrees with the stands of its sister church in terms of Kosovo and Metohija, and he also criticized Serbia’s political leadership…

Roma integration idles (Al Jazeera) The Roma are Europe’s biggest ethnic minority. For decades they have been victims of racism, discrimination and social exclusion. In 2005 twelve European countries declared “the decade of Roma inclusion” and, in 2011, the European Union established a framework for their integration. But in its latest report, the E.U. Commission concluded that not only has inadequate progress been made but that the majority of states failed to allocate sufficient resources for Roma inclusion…

Grassroots ‘ecumenical friendship’ strengthens Catholic-Orthodox relations (Catholic World Report) Rather than collecting dust on a Vatican shelf, Pope John Paul II’s apostolic letter “Orientale Lumen” (“Light of the East”), which encourages Latin Catholics to better know the traditions of the Christian East, has continued to inspire a Washington, D.C.-based grassroots ecumenical movement for almost two decades. Initially planned as a single meeting to discuss the pope’s work, the Orientale Lumen Conference has become an annual gathering open to anyone. In some ways, it has kept the light of Orthodox-Catholic dialogue burning even while official dialogues hit roadblocks…



Tags: Syrian Civil War Violence against Christians Ecumenism Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Roma