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March, 2018
Volume 44, Number 1
  
17 August 2016
Greg Kandra




Sister Ferdos Zora teaches students in a preschool in Erbil run by the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena. (photo: Paul Jeffrey)

With summer nearing an end, a lot of kids are heading back to school. This image, from the Summer edition of ONE, shows schoolchildren in Erbil: displaced young Iraqis who fled ISIS, beginning life over in Kurdistan. CNEWA President Msgr. John E. Kozar visited the region last spring with a delegation that included CNEWA’s chair, Cardinal Timothy Dolan:

Pastoral visits included stops to the Martha Schmouny Clinic in the Ain Kawa area of Erbil; Al Bishara School in Erbil, where the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena now teach more than 680 displaced students; a youth center in Ain Kawa for a “town hall” conversation with families and community elders; St. Peter’s Seminary, which forms priests for the Chaldean Church; a clinic in Dohuk offering care to hundreds of displaced persons each day; and a visit to displaced families hunkered down in the remote village of Inishke.

With each visit, the delegation made time to listen, to counsel and to offer comfort.

United in faith, the displaced and the delegation together offered prayers and celebrated the Eucharist in the Chaldean and Syriac Catholic traditions.

The pastoral visit highlighted the efforts of parishioners, religious sisters, parish priests and bishops who have partnered with CNEWA in setting up nurseries, schools and clinics, apostolates of the church that not only heal and educate, but provide a source of hope.

“One of my hopes for this pastoral visit,” said CNEWA’s Msgr. Kozar, “was to highlight CNEWA’s unique role in coordinating worldwide Catholic aid, on behalf of the Holy Father, and deploying that aid through the local church to those most in need.”

Want to help children such as these? Visit this giving page to learn what you can do.



Tags: Iraq Children Iraqi Christians Sisters Education

17 August 2016
Greg Kandra




A Syrian man drives a three-wheeler on a street in the northern Syrian town of Manbij as civilians go back to their homes on 14 August, after the Arab-Kurdish alliance known as the Syrian Democratic Forces drove ISIS from the city. (photo: Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images)

Jordan’s reversal on Syrian work permits starts to bear fruit (BBC) More than 650,000 Syrians are registered as refugees in Jordan. However, until recently, the government allowed only a few thousand to work. It was worried they would push down wages, take jobs from Jordanians and be encouraged to stay permanently, stirring up resentment. Now the authorities are experimenting with another possibility — that the presence of so many Syrians could boost the sluggish economy…

U.S.-backed Syrian forces gave defeated ISIS militants safe passage (USA TODAY) Islamic State fighters surrounded during the key battle for Manbij, Syria, last week agreed to surrender their weapons to U.S.-backed Syrian forces in return for safe passage out of the embattled city, a senior defense official said Tuesday. It was the first such agreement with the terror group…

Turkey to release 38,000 prisoners jailed before coup (BBC) Turkey is to release conditionally 38,000 prisoners jailed before last month’s failed coup, while its jails are crowded with new detainees. Some 23,000 people have been detained or arrested since the July coup, although the government has not said its move is to free up space for them…

Uproar in Egyptian mosques as clerics are ordered to read state-written homilies (AP) Launched last month, a new initiative mandates that all imams at state-run mosques read pre-written sermons distributed by the ministry. The measure — which expands upon a three-year-old effort to provide general guidelines — is unprecedented in Egypt, even under previous autocratic governments…

Retired Indian archbishop dies of cancer (Vatican Radio) Retired Catholic Archbishop Raphael Cheenath of Cuttack-Bhubaneshwar, the champion of the cause of Christians who bore the brunt of one of the worst Christian persecutions India has ever witnessed in modern times, expired on 14 August. The 82-year old archbishop, who led the archdiocese for over 30 years, died of colon cancer at the Holy Spirit Hospital in Mumbai…

Ethiopia says small-scale irrigation reduces drought effects (AllAfrica.com) The Ministry of Farming and Natural Resource said that small-scale irrigation schemes have played a big role in reducing El Niño induced drought effects. Speaking at consultative meeting on resource mobilization for sustainable irrigation system yesterday, State Minister Frenesh Mekuria said that the nation’s overall small-scale irrigation activities in the last dry season were encouraging…



Tags: Syria Egypt Ethiopia Turkey ISIS

16 August 2016
Greg Kandra




Sister Elizabeth Endrias assists a trainee at the Congregation of the Daughters of St. Anne Vocational Training Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. (photo: CNEWA)

One of the hallmarks of our CNEWA heroes is that they often give something beyond price and beyond measure: hope. Among those who do this selflessly are the women of the Congregation of the Daughters of St. Anne in Ethiopia.

Last year, we profiled one of them, a young woman named Sister Elizabeth Endrias. We first met her during our Year of Sisters, She was supervising the Women’s Promotion Center in Ethiopia’s capital, training some of the poorest women and girls in fabric cutting, sewing and embroidery. The purpose: survival.

The sister in charge, Sister Elizabeth Endrias, is 24 years old. But the program she’s developed is intensive. “Training takes from ten months to two years,” she explains. “This year we have thirty trainees in dressmaking and seven in embroidery.”

With resources limited, the school has begun charging a modest fee. For the poorest students, however, money is never a barrier. “In this case we intervene, inquire about their difficulties,” Sister Elizabeth says. “And when we find it necessary to support them, we offer them free education to complete their studies.”

She remembers the day one teenager arrived with her father. “He had the desire to help his daughter in her training. He told me the extent of their poverty but willed to pay.”

The father paid for two months, but grew ill and passed away. “Imagine the challenge facing this 18-year-old girl,” Sister Elizabeth says. “We not only exempted her from fees, but also gave back to her mother the two months payment that her father had paid.”

That young seamstress — her name is Hanna — plans to start a dressmaking business to support her family. “Sister Elizabeth is very special for me,” she says. “She rescued me from losing this opportunity after the death of my father. I am very grateful to her.”

The Congregation of the Daughters of St. Anne also runs clinics in Ethiopia — bringing healing as well as hope to so many in need. To help support these and other heroes like Sister Elizabeth Endrias, visit this page.



Tags: Ethiopia Sisters Women

16 August 2016
Greg Kandra




Children flash victory signs as they play in Manbij, following its liberation from ISIS. (photo: Reuters/Rodi Said)

Friday, the northern Syria city of Manbij was liberated from ISIS, and residents celebrated by doing things that the militant group had forbidden.

From the BBC:

They have poured into the streets enjoying basic rights they had been denied for two years, including shaving off their beards and smoking.

US-backed Kurdish and Arab fighters fought 73 days to drive IS out of Manbij, close to the Turkish border.

About 2,000 civilians being used as human shields were also freed.

Reuters news agency spoke to a resident of Manbij who described a spot where people were beheaded. “For anything or using the excuse that he did not believe [in God], they put him and cut his head off.

“It is all injustice,” he said.

“I feel joy and [it is like a] dream I am dreaming. I cannot believe it, I cannot believe it. Things I saw no one saw,” a woman said screaming and fainting, according to Reuters.

Another woman thanked the fighters that had set them free: “You are our children, you are our heroes, you are the blood of our hearts, you are our eyes. Go out, Daesh [Arabic name for IS]!”

The Washington Post noted:

Under the Islamic State, women were forced to cover their faces. But on Friday, some of them were photographed with lifted veils.

One woman set fire to a niqab, a veil that covers all of a woman’s face except the area around her eyes.

Below is a video report on the liberation of Manbij:



Tags: Syria ISIS

16 August 2016
Greg Kandra




A Russian long-range bomber carries out air strikes against ISIS and Al Nusra Front targets in Syria. This is the first time Russia’s bombers used an Iranian base to carry out air strikes against terrorist targets in Syria. (photo: TASS via Getty Images)

Russia uses Iranian base for Syria campaign (The New York Times) Russian bombers launched attacks in Syria from an Iranian air base for the first time on Tuesday, potentially altering the political and military equation in the Middle East. Long-range Tupolev-22M3 bombers, which would otherwise have to fly from Russia, used an Iranian base near Hamadan to hit a series of targets inside Syria, according to a brief statement from the Russian Defense Ministry…

Ukraine puts troops on combat alert (Vatican Radio) Ukraine has put its troops on combat alert along the country’s de facto borders with Crimea and separatist rebels in the east…

Severe weather threatening Ethiopia’s food production (ANA) Seasonal floods followed by drought caused by El Niño have caused severe crop damage in Ethiopia. However, in a Monday press release, the United Nations warned that further damage caused by cooler weather brought on by La Niña, expected in October and onwards, could further devastate food production. The U.N. Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) highlighted that if the floods worsened later this year, there could be outbreaks of crop and livestock diseases, further reducing agricultural productivity and complicating recovery. “The situation is critical now,” said Amadou Allahoury, FAO representative to Ethiopia…

Cardinal: the need for Muslim-Christian dialogue (L’Osservatore Romano) “Often I realize that many problems are due to the ignorance on both sides. And ignorance generates fear,” says Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran. “In order to live together it is essential to look at those who are different from us with esteem, benevolent curiosity and the desire to walk together...”

Travels of Patriarch Gregorios III (ByzCath.org) Politicians, business leaders and representatives of international organizations came together in the heart of Vienna, Austria, for the 27th annual Crans Montana Forum. Attendees discussed a wide range of subjects from the role of women in decision-making to renewable energies — the main angle being the rise of central-eastern Europe as a new power — and the migration crisis. One of the most memorable comments was that of Melkite Greek Catholic Patriarch Gregory III of Antioch and All the East, Alexandria and Jerusalem, who had a — perhaps surprising — view on the reception of Syrian refugees in Europe…

Kerala police launch ‘pink patrol’ to improve women’s security (IBT) The Kerala Police on Monday deployed three women patrol teams, called Pink Patrol, in Thiruvananthapuram. Kerala Chief Minister Pinari Vijayan and his wife Kamala Vijayan formed the teams to improve women’s security in the state…

Egypt Christians stage rare Cairo protest demanding rights (Associated Press) Egyptian Christians staged a rare protest in downtown Cairo on Saturday to demand the government uphold their rights, saying they are being treated as second-class citizens in the Muslim-majority country. Standing on the steps of a courthouse in the capital, some three dozen demonstrators braved Egypt’s draconian protest ban to hold signs aloft, calling for their legal rights to be upheld in disputes between Muslims and Christians…

Iraqi Christians fret about going home even if Islamic State is ousted (Crux) Iraqi Christians appear divided about whether they will be able to return home after ISIS militants are flushed out of the battle-scarred Nineveh Plain. They say their safety must be guaranteed at all costs. “If the liberation of the Nineveh Plain region is successful, infrastructure is rebuilt and there is security, I would want to be among the first to return,” said Fadi Yousif, who teaches children in the Ashti II camp for displaced Christians in Ain Kawa, near Irbil. “It’s my home. I love that place. But what is absolutely essential is that we have real security there…”



Tags: Syria Iraq India Egypt Ukraine

12 August 2016
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis sits with refugee children from Syria at the Vatican on 11 August.
(photo: CNS/L’Osservatore Romano via Reuters)


Pope Francis has lunch with Syrian refugees (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis had lunch with a group of 21 Syrian refugees on Thursday at the Casa Santa Marta. During the luncheon, both adults and children had the possibility to speak with Pope Francis about the beginnings of their life in Italy...

Religious staff suspended in Turkey coup aftermath (Christian Today) More than 2,500 officials have been suspended from Turkey’s Religious Affairs Directorate in another crackdown following the failed military coup last month. The move, announced on Tuesday, was part of a wider purge of those believed to support US-based Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen, whom the Turkish government has blamed for the uprising. More than 50,000 people have been rounded up, sacked, or arrested in the wake of the July 15 attempted coup, and this latest figure brings the total dismissed from the religious affairs agency to 3,672...

Turkey, Iran pledge cooperation over Syria (AP) The foreign ministers of Turkey and Iran agreed Friday to boost trade relations and pledged greater cooperation on resolving the Syria crisis despite their divergences on the issue...

Fractured lands: how the Arab world came apart (The New York Times) Azar is one of six people whose lives are chronicled in these pages. The six are from different regions, different cities, different tribes, different families, but they share, along with millions of other people in and from the Middle East, an experience of profound unraveling. Their lives have been forever altered by upheavals that began in 2003 with the American invasion of Iraq, and then accelerated with the series of revolutions and insurrections that have collectively become known in the West as the Arab Spring. They continue today with the depredations of ISIS, with terrorist attacks and with failing states...

Russian Orthodox Church launches its own winery (Calvert Journal) The Russian Orthodox Church is set to start producing its own wine, with the first bottles expected to be ready next year. Set in the Krasnodar region of southern Russia, on the Black Sea coast, the Church’s vineyards were constructed by subsidiary company Mezyb and cover over 70 hectares of land. They are situated next to the summer residence of Church leader Patriarch Kirill, who will surely be first in line for a bottle...



11 August 2016
Greg Kandra




Arpine Ghazaryan cuts her son’s hair. She lives with her two boys in Gyumri, Armenia — just one of many families in the country who are now fatherless. Discover why, and what is being done to help them, in Armenia’s Children, Left Behind in the Summer edition of ONE.
(photo: Nazik Armenakyan)




11 August 2016
Greg Kandra




An injured boy stands amid rubble outside his home after airstrikes in Aleppo, Syria.
(photo: CNS/Ali Mustafa, EPA)


Aleppo bishop speaks of “destroyed country and families” (Vatican Radio) As the United Nations called for an urgent humanitarian pause to the fighting raging in the divided city of Aleppo where two million people lack access to clean water and electricity, the Chaldean Bishop of Aleppo speaks about his “destroyed country and the destroyed families” in Syria...

Casualties rise as fighting continues in Ukraine (Vatican Radio) Fighting is raging once again in eastern Ukraine with the United Nations saying that civilian casualties have reached the highest level in a year. The ongoing conflict between government forces and Russian-backed separatists has also added to pressure on media, after personal details were released of thousands of journalists...

Ethiopia dismisses calls for UN observers as protests rage (Al Jazeera) Ethopia has dismissed a plea from the United Nations that it allow international observers to investigate the killing of protesters by security forces during a recent bout of anti-government demonstrations. Getachew Reda, a government spokesman, told Al Jazeera on Thursday that the UN was entitled to its opinion but the government of Ethiopia was responsible for the safety of its own people. Reda’s comments came after the UN urged the government to allow observers to investigate the killings of at least 90 protesters in the Oromia and Amhara regions over the weekend...

Thousands still displaced in Gaza (USA TODAY) For the past two years, Iftetah Amsha, 50, has been sharing a hot, cramped mobile home with her husband and 10 children. Their house was destroyed during the 50-day war with Israel that ended two years ago this month. “I don’t know when I will get out of here,” she said. The conflict left 18,000 housing units destroyed or damaged, according to the United Nations. Fewer than 4,500 have been reconstructed and more than 13,000 families remain displaced in this crowded strip of land along Israel’s southwestern border...

Cheering on the Olympic Refugee Team (CNS) Glued to the improvised screen set up on the patio of the Caritas house, the refugees yelled and they cried. But most of all, they cheered. They cheered for their two Congolese colleagues, Popole Misenga, 24, and Yolande Mabika, 28, who were competing in judo as part of the United Nations’ Refugee Olympic team. “They represent all of us today,” said an emotional Mirelle Muluila, also from Congo. “They represent the strength it takes to come from nothing and being considered a ‘nobody,’ to becoming a champion,” she cried out as others around her agreed...



10 August 2016
Greg Kandra




A Syrian fighter sits next to two food containers and a mirror in Douma, Syria, on 28 July. Pope Francis said 7 August that innocent men, women and children are paying the ultimate price in the continuing conflict raging in Syria. Wednesday, Turkey and Russia announced a meeting to find a solution to the conflict. (photo: CNS/Mohammed Badra, EPA)

Turkey, Russia to discuss solution for Syria (AP) A delegation of Turkish foreign ministry, military and intelligence officials is traveling to Russia for discussions on finding a solution to the Syria conflict, Turkey’s foreign minister said Wednesday. The announcement by Mevlut Cavusoglu came a day after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan met with Russia’s Vladimir Putin in St. Petersburg for the first time since the countries agreed to mend relations soured by Turkey’s downing of a Russian plane in November...

Israeli prosecutors charge UN employee in Gaza with aiding Hamas (The New York Times) Israeli prosecutors on Tuesday charged a Palestinian employee of the United Nations in the Gaza Strip with providing material assistance to Hamas, the Islamist group that controls the territory, including helping to build a jetty for its military wing...

Russia accuses Ukraine of incursion (Reuters) Russia’s Federal Security Service said on Wednesday it had thwarted two armed Ukrainian attempts to get saboteurs into Crimea and dismantled a Ukrainian spy network inside the annexed peninsula. The FSB accused Ukrainian special forces of planning to carry out terrorist attacks inside Crimea targeting critical infrastructure and said an FSB employee and a Russian soldier had been killed in clashes with Ukrainian forces...

Muslim woman is helping Christians displaced by ISIS (Christian Post) Many are familiar with “The Vicar of Baghdad,” Canon Andrew White, the head of one of the most prominent relief charities helping thousands of Christians displaced by ISIS, but many don’t know that much of the work White gets credit for is actually carried out by a Muslim woman...

Syrian refugee relishes her Olympic dream (BBC) Syrian refugee Rami Anis says earning a standing ovation at Rio 2016 after setting a personal best in the men’s 100m freestyle is a “dream come true.” Anis clocked 54.25 seconds to finish 56th out of 59 swimmers in the heats. The 25-year-old fled war-torn Syria in 2015, travelling by boat across the Mediterranean Sea to Turkey before continuing to Belgium...



9 August 2016
Greg Kandra




Selim Sayegh served for many years as the Latin patriarchal vicar of Jordan.
(photo: John E. Kozar)


Selim Sayegh was an auxiliary bishop of Jerusalem, serving for many years as the Latin patriarchal vicar of Jordan, based in Amman. He worked closely with CNEWA, particularly helping the poor and marginalized, most notably refugees and children.

Before he took mandatory retirement in 2012 at the age of 75, he chatted with us about the country he served:

Jordan is now passing through a difficult political and economic stage and we pray to God that we can overcome it in peace, and that we always proceed toward the best with clear thinking, wisdom and responsibility. We all know that achieving the best is not done by one push on the button or remote control, but it needs a strong will, time, planning, work and lots of sacrifices.

...The state does not consider the Iraqi migrants in Jordan as migrants, but as guests. Lawfully, they are not under the migrant’s laws and regulations. They are living in peace and enjoy security and privileges that cost the Jordanian government millions yearly. The government, for example, supports “bread for all” Jordanians and non-Jordanians. A minority from the Iraqi migrants is rich and does not need any support.

The church helps them in any way possible, especially through the Caritas Jordan and CNEWA/Pontifical Mission.

He also touched on a project close to his heart, the Our Lady of Peace Center in Amman, a haven for children who are handicapped or developmentally disabled.

ONE: One of your most important initiatives has been Our Lady of Peace Center in Amman. Where did you get that idea?

Bishop Selim Sayegh: Our Lady of Peace Center addressed two prominent needs of the Church in Jordan. The first need is the service of the handicapped. The Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem established its schools and charitable institutions in Jordan in the middle of 19th century, but it has no institution or activity to look after the handicapped in Jordan. They are the poorest of the poor and most in need of services and help. I saw that the church should have a place to perform her duty and witness to Christian charity in this field.

The second need is to assist the church youth movements. The Christian youth in Jordan did not have any place for their spiritual retreats, camps, and other activities. In addition to this, Jordan was and still is the only country in the Middle East that welcomes those coming from Israel, Palestine, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, the nations of Europe and other countries. Many times, convents and organizations related to the Church ask us to arrange a place for their meetings in the Middle East. We all trust that the collaboration between [CNEWA] and Our Lady of Peace Center will last, so that it can continue to serve the handicapped freely to the glory of God. Jesus said: “Let them see your good works, that they will give glory to your Father in heaven.”

Selim Sayegh’s heroic dedication to the suffering and marginalized in Jordan has had an enduring impact — and we have no doubt his own “good works” will “give glory” for years to come.

Below is a video of the bishop, whom we also profiled in 2009 during the Year for Priests.








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