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Current Issue
September, 2017
Volume 43, Number 3
  
9 November 2017
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis receives members of the community of the Ukrainian Pontifical College in Rome.
(photo: Vatican Radio)


Pope Francis marked the 85th anniversary of the foundation of St. Josaphat’s Ukrainian Pontifical College in Rome by sharing some thoughts with the school’s seminarians.

From Vatican Radio:

In his message to future Ukrainian priests, Pope Francis recalled that the institution was built with the intent of conveying a message of love and closeness to those faithful “who live in areas of suffering and persecution.”

He invited them to prepare for their apostolic mission as deacons and priests studying the Church’s Social Doctrine and recalling the example of Pope Pius XI whom, he said, “always and firmly raised his voice in defending the faith, the freedom of the Church and the transcendent dignity of every human person” while condemning the atheistic and inhumane ideologies that bloodied the 20th century.

“Also today the world is world is wounded by wars and violence” the Pope said with a particular reference to the beloved Ukrainian nation “from which you came and to where you will return” after having completed your studies in Rome.

Backing his encouragement to spread a culture of peace and acceptance with words from the Gospel, the Pope said “to you, seminarians and priests of the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church, these challenges may seem out of your reach; but let us remember the words of the Apostle John: I have written to you, young men, because you are strong, and the Word of God abideth in you, and you have overcome the wicked one.”

The Pope said that by loving and proclaiming the Word they will become true shepherds of the communities that will be entrusted to them.

Read more here.

Meantime, CNS has this report from Junno Arocho Esteves, offering the pope’s personal remembrance of a beloved Ukrainian bishop:

Meeting a group of Ukrainian Catholics, Pope Francis said that long ago in Argentina, he had learned about the suffering of Christians in their homeland and about the beauty of their liturgy.

Speaking to a group of professors, students and alumni from the Ukrainian Pontifical College of St. Josephat, a seminary in Rome, the pope said he valued the lessons he learned as a boy from Bishop Stepan Chmil.

“It did me so much good because he spoke to me about the persecution, sufferings, the ideologies that persecuted the Christians” in Ukraine under communism, the pope said on 9 November.

Then-Father Chmil was among the first Eastern-rite Catholics allowed to enter the Salesian order while retaining their liturgical rites and traditions.

After completing his studies in Turin, Italy, Father Chmil ministered to countless Ukrainian refugees who arrived in Western Europe during World War II.

In 1948, he was sent to Argentina to minister to Ukrainian refugees there and met a young Jorge Mario Bergoglio, who was in his last year of grade school.

“I learned how to assist at Mass in the Ukrainian rite from him; he taught me everything,” the pope said.

Assisting Father Chmil twice a week, he said, “taught me to be open to a different liturgy, which has always remained in my heart as something beautiful.”

After Father Chmil’s death in 1978, the pope said, it was revealed that he had been “consecrated a bishop in secret in Rome” by Cardinal Josyf Slipyj, then-major archbishop.

Pope Francis also said he gave testimony for the Ukrainian bishop’s canonization cause to the current head of the Ukrainian Catholic Church, Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk of Kiev-Halych.

“I wanted to remember him today,” he said, “because it is right to give thanks to him for the good that he has done for me.”



9 November 2017
Greg Kandra




Syria has declared victory over ISIS, but questions remain about how Syria will rebuild and recover after the lengthy civil war that has decimated much of the country. The video above shows some of the devastation and explores some solutions. (video: The National/YouTube)

Syria declares victory over ISIS (Reuters) Syria’s army declared victory over Islamic State on Thursday, saying its capture of the jihadists’ last town in the country marked the collapse of their project in the region...

An Iraqi town where Muslims, Jews and Christians coexist, in theory (The New York Times) Today Amadiya’s population of 9,000 is overwhelmingly Kurdish Muslim. But in the early 20th century there were said to be about two-thirds that many people, about evenly divided among Muslims, Christians and Jews — although there were 10 mosques compared with two churches and two synagogues. Everyone was packed into a circumference of a mile and a half...

Pope John Paul I declared ‘venerable’ (CNS) Pope Francis recognized that Pope John Paul I, who served only 33 days as pope, lived the Christian virtues in a heroic way. The Vatican announced Pope Francis’ decision on 9 November. It marks the first major step on the path to sainthood for the pope who died in 1978 at the age of 65, shocking the world and a church that had just mourned the death of Blessed Paul VI...

U.N.: 36.5 million people in East Africa face food crisis (CoastWeek.com) The number of people facing crisis-level food insecurity in the Eastern Africa region has increased by 18 percent to 36.5 million in October from 30.9 million a year ago, UN humanitarian agency said Tuesday...

Pope Francis: St. Francis Cabrini is a modern model for handling migration (CNS) St. Frances Cabrini, the missionary to Italian immigrants in the United States in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, “teaches us the path to handling the epochal phenomenon of migration by joining charity and justice,” Pope Francis said...

Blessed Rani Maria seen as a beacon of hope for Indian Christians (Global Sisters Report) The beatification of a martyred Catholic nun will help evangelization in India, where preaching Christ’s message has become increasingly difficult, church leaders say. Sister Rani Maria Vattalil’s beatification “is a major turning point in the history of Christianity in India, where peace-loving Christians face persecution,” said Shibu Thomas, head of Persecution Relief, an ecumenical forum that records attacks against Christians in India...



8 November 2017
Dan Stockman, Catholic News Service




Good Shepherd Sister Monique Tarabeh is pictured in an undated selfie photo. Sister Tarabeh grew up in Damascus, Syria, and her family still lives there despite the ongoing civil war that started in 2011. (photo: CNS/courtesy Good Shepherd Sister Monique Tarabeh)

Good Shepherd Sister Monique Tarabeh’s visit home in July and August was gut-wrenching. Sister Tarabeh grew up in Damascus, Syria, and her family still lives there, despite the civil war that started in 2011. The conflict has killed hundreds of thousands of people and forced millions to flee to safety in other nations.

Currently, Sister Tarabeh serves in Rome as the communications coordinator for the Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd congregation. Previously, she worked in Lebanon and Syria, using her master’s degree in graphic design.

She recently spoke to Global Sisters Report about her summer visit home and what she saw there.

Q: Your family in Damascus is safe, and you got to spend time with them. What was it like in Damascus?

A: In Damascus, the situation was bad. There were too many bombs. But my sister has a house in the mountains, so I stayed there awhile and then joined the community in Homs to help them. They needed help because so many families have moved from their area into Homs, even though there is all this damage.

Q: We’ve been told that Homs had been devastated by bombing and seen photos of a city destroyed by the war. You’re saying people are moving there?

A: Yes, people are going there because the areas where they live are even worse. Our center in Homs is working with the people who have moved there to give them education and psychological help. They teach them how to process the trauma, and they have special programs for children and youth. ... Around the convent, all those areas were bombed and destroyed, but the building of the convent and the church is untouched. You cannot believe it — it's like the hands of God were covering it.

I served in Homs for seven months in 2006 and 2007, and those areas ... were the richest, most beautiful places in Homs. Each building had five floors and balconies. Trees lined the streets, and there were flowers. It was a place you liked to go visit.

People walk in front of destroyed buildings at the site of a 2016 twin bomb attack in Homs, Syria.
(photo: CNS/EPA)


When I saw this area where I spent a really beautiful time with the people there, when you see this empty, all this damage, my heart is broken. I stayed one day, and I could not speak when I returned to the convent.

And then to think about those people coming to Homs from places that are worse, like Aleppo, where you can’t see two stones stacked together because it’s all flat now. It’s hard to find the words.

I tried to talk about this, but it’s very painful when I remember all those people and their faces, and now they are not here. All the beautiful images all coming back at once. I cannot believe it happened.

Q: How do you deal with that? How do you continue working?

A: I took photos in Homs, but I can never take photos in Damascus, because Damascus is where I lived. I don’t like to see them at all. It’s not easy to see the place you grew up, and now, it’s destroyed.

Some areas are better than others. My family’s home is untouched, thank God, but all around them is damage. What happened to my family is nothing when you see the other areas.

But the people have a good spirit. I think as a way of surviving, they share a lot of humor and jokes. I really admire them. They do everything they can to let it pass and begin a new life.

Q: How do the sisters continue working? How do they keep their spirits up amid all the misery?

A: I asked them, “How can you continue? Nobody can just serve and give all the time.” One said, “Monique, when I saw I could do something for people, I forget myself.”

We also have Good Shepherd Sisters in Lebanon, and they can go there for a few days and rest with them.

But you are never safe. It’s just, every time when they go out, they don’t know if they’ll be back or not. They live day by day and trust that God will protect them.

This is an edited version of a story originally published in Global Sisters Report, a project of National Catholic Reporter. Visit their website for more.



8 November 2017
Greg Kandra




The icon above depicts the Synaxis of the Archangel Michael and the Other Bodiless Powers, a feast day celebrated on 8 November throughout the Eastern Christian world. (photo: OCA.org)

This date, 8 November, marks a significant feast for the Eastern churches: the Synaxis of the Archangel Michael and the Other Bodiless Powers.

Details:

The Synaxis of the Chief of the Heavenly Hosts, Archangel Michael and the Other Heavenly Bodiless Powers: Archangels Gabriel, Raphael, Uriel, Selaphiel, Jehudiel, Barachiel, and Jeremiel was established at the beginning of the fourth century at the Council of Laodicea, which met several years before the First Ecumenical Council. The 35th Canon of the Council of Laodicea condemned and denounced as heretical the worship of angels as gods and rulers of the world, but affirmed their proper veneration.

A feast day was established in November, the ninth month after March (with which the year began in ancient times) since there are Nine Ranks of Angels. The eighth day of the month was chosen for the Synaxis of all the Bodiless Powers of Heaven since the Day of the Dread Last Judgment is called the Eighth Day by the holy Fathers. After the end of this age (characterized by its seven days of Creation) will come the Eighth Day, and then “the Son of Man shall come in His Glory and all the holy Angels with Him” (Mt. 25:31).

Read more about this feast here.

Troparion — Tone 4
Commanders of the heavenly hosts, / we who are unworthy beseech you, / by your prayers encompass us beneath the wings of your immaterial glory, / and faithfully preserve us who fall down and cry to you: / “Deliver us from all harm, for you are the commanders of the powers on high!”

Kontakion — Tone 2
Commanders of God’s armies and ministers of the divine glory, / princes of the bodiless angels and guides of mankind, / ask for what is good for us, and for great mercy, / supreme commanders of the Bodiless Hosts.



8 November 2017
Greg Kandra




Pope Francis greets the Grand Imam of Al-Azhar at the Vatican on Tuesday.
(photo: EPA/Vatican Radio)


Pope meets Egypt’s Muslim leader (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis met on Tuesday with the Grand Imam of Al-Azhar, Sheikh Ahmed Muhammad al-Tayeb who is in Rome to attend a conference organised by the St Egidio community...

Jesuits launch first child protection center in Addis Ababa (Vatican Radio) Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) Ethiopia, a Catholic Church Organisation that works with refugees, launched the Child Protection Centre in Addis Ababa, which is the first of its kind in the city. The center, which is strategically located in the capital city, is established to respond to the growing demand of the urban refugee community due to the growing number of refugee children and their vulnerability...

Iraq’s Christians worry over Iraqi-Kurdish conflict (Al Jazeera) Many Christians are uncertain about their future in Iraq after government forces, with the help of Shia militia, retook most of the disputed territories in Iraq controlled by the Kurds...

Germany pledges more aid to Jordan (The Jordan Times) Germany on Tuesday pledged to provide Jordan with over 575 million euros in assistance to respond to the Kingdom’s development needs and support the Syrian refugees in Jordan...

Indian cardinal makes pastoral visit to New Zealand (New Zealand Catholic) The Syro-Malabar Catholic community in New Zealand was thrilled to be visited last month by Cardinal Mar George Alencherry, the major archbishop of their church. The church is an Eastern Catholic Major Archiepiscopal Church based in Kerala, India. It is a sui iuris particular church in full communion with the Pope and the worldwide Catholic Church. There are about 4500 Syro-Malabar Catholics in New Zealand and about 10 priests of that rite are ministering in this country, often in Latin rite parishes...



7 November 2017
Greg Kandra




In the video above, lonely elderly in Armenia find purpose and happiness spending time at the Nadine Basmajian Day Care Center in Gyumri, supported in part by CNEWA.
(video: ArmenianSisters.org)


One of the projects CNEWA is helping to support in Armenia is the Nadine Basmajian Day Care Center for the elderly in Gyumri. We reported on the center a few years ago in ONE:

At the Nadine Basmajian Center, 35 elderly people currently find company and sympathy as they spend their days there; some 200 seniors have benefited since the [Armenian Sisters of the Immaculate Conception] launched the center.

The most energetic participant, Hamazasp Hakobian, 85, divides his life into three phases: orphanage, the end of World War II and the earthquake.

“I overcame the postwar famine, but the earthquake destroyed everything,” he says of a calamity that killed his wife, leaving him to rear his three teenagers alone. Now he is alone again.

“They all have left the country, looking for sources of income and means of survival,” he says of his children. “We are here in this center so we don’t lose our minds with loneliness, hunger and cold. We couldn’t bear to be away for even a day,” he says, with a kindly look to his friends.

Now, the center has sent us a video, chronicling the day-to-day life of some of these “new orphans” being cared for by the sisters. See for yourself, in the video above, what a wonderful difference it is making in their lives. Thanks to our generous donors for helping to bring light and life to this corner of Armenia!



7 November 2017
Greg Kandra




In this image from 2013, altar boys serve the liturgy at the Chaldean parish in Amman. To learn more about Iraqi families seeking to start a new life in Jordan, read Out of Iraq in the Spring 2013 edition of ONE. (photo: Cory Eldridge)



7 November 2017
Greg Kandra




In the video above, Syrian children tell some of the horrors they experienced in the final days of ISIS in Raqqa. (video: VOA/YouTube)

Al Azhar reacts to massacre at U.S church (Fides) Violent acts “which desecrate the holiness of places of worship and destroy innocent lives threaten the people’s stability and security.” And the shedding of innocent blood, irrespective of race and the religion of the victims, “is forbidden by all religions.” With these words, the University of Al Azhar, the main academic and theological center of Sunni Islam, expressed in a formal statement the condolences to the victims of the massacre carried out on Sunday, 5 November by a former military in a Baptist church in Sutherland Springs, Texas...

Rebuilding ‘Hell Square’ in Syria’s Raqqa (Voice of America) In mid-October, ISIS was driven out of Raqqa as the remaining families fled the battle. Making the city once again livable, according to officials, is now an overwhelming task complicated by a political deadlock. Rebuilding lives after mass trauma, they add, may be close to impossible...

Maronite patriarch urges ‘vigilance over any sabotage scheme aimed at undermining Lebanon’ (Fides) Following the sudden resignation of Prime Minister Saad Hariri, “there must be vigilance and full awareness against any sabotage plot or scheme aimed at undermining stability in the country.” This is how Maronite Patriarch Bechara Boutros Rai voiced regret over Prime Minister Saad Hariri’s shock resignation, warning of the destabilizing effects that this choice might have on the fragile national balance...

Archbishop emeritus S. Michael Augustine of India dies (Vatican Radio) Archbishop Emeritus S. Michael Augustine of Pondicherry-Cuddalore diocese of India passed away this morning in a local hospital. He served for 39 years as a bishop and 56 years as a priest till God called him to Himself at the age of 85...

Victims of ISIS in focus at U.N. forum (CNA) Persecuted religious minorities in Syria and Iraq deserve a better future after suffering at the hands of the Islamic State group. That was the message of Archbishop Bernadito Auza, the apostolic nuncio leading the Holy See’s permanent observer mission to the U.N. He said justice for the survivors “demands that we seek to return to them, as much as possible, what Daesh pillaged from them...”

Churches in U.K. to turn red in support of victims of persecution (Vatican Radio) Catholic schools and churches across the United Kingdom will be floodlit red to highlight the plight of persecuted Christians across the world...



6 November 2017
Greg Kandra




Cardinal Angelo Amato presided at the beatification ceremony for Sister Rani Maria in India on 4 November. (photo: Vatican Radio)

Indian sister beatified (Times of India) With teary eyes and overwhelming joy, the congregation celebrated the beatification of Blessed Rani Maria on Saturday. With the official declaration of the beatification, Blessed Rani Maria has become the first sister to be beatified in northern India and the seventh Indian to be beatified, after Sister Alphonsa, the Rev. Kuriakose Chavara, Mother Euphrasia, Father Joseph Vaz, Father Gonsalo Garcia and Mother Teresa…

Truck bomb in Syria kills dozens fleeing battle against ISIS (AP) A spokesman for U.S.-backed forces in Syria says more than a hundred people have been killed in a truck bomb blast in eastern Syria. Mustafa Bali of the Syrian Democratic Forces says the victims were refugees from the war against the ISIS group in the region. He said the attack occurred on Saturday near the Conoco gas plant near Deir Ezzor city…

Jordan plans new city to ease crowding, congestion (Middle East Eye) Jordan has announced plans to build a new city east of the capital Amman in order to ease rising population density and traffic congestion. The project to build the city some 19 miles from Amman was part of a drive to stimulate the economy and attract long-term investment, the government said in a statement published Sunday…

Archbishop of Canterbury forges closer ties with Russian Orthodox (Times of London) The archbishop of Canterbury is scheduled to pay a groundbreaking official visit to Moscow this month for talks with the patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church, and he will be received by senior politicians. This will be the first time that the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion has held talks with the patriarch in Moscow, and it is a signal of the growing importance of the Russian Orthodox Church, now one of the world’s biggest, richest and most powerful churches...

In Lebanon, maestro helps voices of refugee children rise above poverty, divisions (Voice of America) They are among the most underprivileged children in Lebanon, and now their voices can soar. For several months, conductor and composer Salim Sahab auditioned youngsters, most of whom work, for a choir of 300. With Syrian and Palestinian refugees selected along with Lebanese children, hopes are that the unifying power of singing will help cross political and sectarian lines…



Tags: Syria India Sisters Jordan Saints

3 November 2017
Greg Kandra




Elizabeth and Hannah Valentine pray at St. Nicholas Antiochian Orthodox Church in Wisconsin.
(photo: Miriam Sushman)


In 2003, we paid a visit to Cedarburg, Wisconsin, just north of Milwaukee, where the people of St. Nicholas Antiochian Orthodox Church are preserving ancient traditions and welcoming a diverse flock:

About half of the parish’s 175 members were raised in other church traditions. Others are second — and third — generation Greek or Russian Orthodox. About 40 are Arab. With this kind of a mix, everyone is thankful for the exclusive use of English in the Divine Liturgy.

Three of the youthful members are Chinese and were adopted by a local family. The oldest child is blind. She has learned the liturgy by heart and chants it with the choir. Her father watched her with pride while her siblings squirmed in the pew. Though the congregants come from different ethnic backgrounds, they are united by their faith and the traditions of the Orthodox Church. “When there is a disagreement, it is never along ethnic lines,” Father [Bill] Olnhausen said. He takes care to explain again and again the meaning of the church’s traditions for newcomers. Repetition, he explained, reinforces tradition.

Some traditions require more from the congregation than just listening. Prostration is common in the Orthodox Church, and on the feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross parishioners knelt and bowed during the procession of the cross.

Among the joyful noises on that day were the voices of the youngest parishioners, some still so young they were wrapped in blankets and lay cooing in the pews. St. Nicholas is child-friendly. A crying room in the back of the church was full of active toddlers whose parents retreated there for a “time out.” Preschoolers attended church school, returning for Communion with the adult parishioners.

Children and adults alike dressed in their Sunday clothes. Ties and white shirts were standard for boys and men and dresses for girls and women.

Community participation is also strong at the church. The church double tithes: 10 percent supports the Antiochian Archdiocese of North America. The other 10 percent goes toward charities and needy individuals.

Read more about Serving a Diverse Community in the November-December 2003 edition of our magazine.







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